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America 127, Us 79, Washington 43, United States 37, Europe 29, Israel 26, North Korea 18, China 17, D.c. 15, Watson 11, Iran 10, Obama 9, U.s. 9, Ronald Reagan 7, Karen 7, Poland 6, United Nations 6, Chuck Hagel 6, Syria 6, South Carolina 6,
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  CSPAN    Politics Public Policy Today    News/Business.  

    March 15, 2013
    10:30 - 6:00am EDT  

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past four years, dr. steven chu. [applause] now i'm here today to talk about what should be our top priority as a nation. that is reigniting the engine of merican economic growth. a rising, thriving middle class and an economy built on nnovation. in my state of the union address, our most important task was to drive that economic growth. i meant it. we should be asking ourselves the questions -- how to make america a land for good jobs? how do we equip people with skills and training to do those jobs? how do we make sure that hard work leads to a decent iving?
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please feel free to sit down. i'm sorry. everyone is standing. maybe it was one of the effects of the sequester. you had to get rid of chairs. [laughter] i chose argonne national lab because few areas hold more promise for creating good jobs and growing our economy than how we use american energy. after years of talking about it, we are poised to take control of our energy future. we produce more oil that we have in 15 years. we import less oil than we had in 20 years. we have doubled the amount of renewable energy that we generate from wind and solar. tens of thousands of good jobs
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to show for it. we are producing more natural gas than we have before that hundreds of thousands of good jobs to show for it. we have supported the first new nuclear power plant in america since the 1970s. we are sending less carbon pollution in the environment and e have in nearly 20 years. we are making progress across the board. it is possible in part because of labs like this and outstanding scientists like many of you -- entrepreneurs, innovators -- all of you are working together to take your discoveries and turn it into a business. think about this. a few years ago, the american auto industry was latlining. thanks to discoveries made right here at argonne, some of the most high tech, fuel-efficient, pretty spiffy cars in the world
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are once again designed, engineered, and built here in the united states. that is why we have to keep investing in scientific research. we have to maintain our edge. the work you are doing today will end up in a product we make and sell tomorrow. you're helping to secure our energy future stop if we do it well, that will help us avoid some of the perils of climate change. it will leave a healthier planet for our kids. to do it, we have to make sure we're making the right noises in ashington. the other day, dr. isaac and directors of two other national laboratories wrote about the effects of the so-called sequester, across the board budget cuts. it will have an effect on scientific research. one of the reasons i was opposed
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to the cuts is because they do not distinguish between vital investment and wasteful rograms. they do not trim the fat, but cut into muscle. there is research being done here that gives a great place for researchers to come, but lso to create all kinds of stuff that create good jobs. dr. isaac said these cuts will force him to stop any new projects down the line. he says, the sudden halt will freeze american science in place while the rest of the world races forward. it will cost millions of dollars in missed future opportunities. because of the sequester, we are looking at two years where we do
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not start new research. at a time when every month you have to replace your smartphone because something new has come up, imagine what that means when china and germany are pumping up their research and we are sitting there doing nothing. we cannot afford to miss these opportunities while the rest of the world races forward. we have to seize opportunities. i want the job breakthroughs in energy or nanotechnology or bioengineering to be right here in the united states of america and creating american jobs and maintaining our technological ead. [applause]
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i want to be clear -- these cuts will harm and not help our economy. they are not the smart way to cut deficits. that is why i'm reaching out to democrats and republicans to come together around a balanced approach smart, phased-in approach to deficit reduction. smart spending cuts and new revenue that will not hurt the middle class or slow economic growth. if we do that, we can move beyond governing from crisis to crisis and keep the focus on policies that create jobs and grow the economy. we can move forward to fixing the broken immigration system and educating our kids and keeping them safe from gun iolence. few pieces are more important than getting the energy future right. here at argonne and other labs around the country, scientists are working to get us where we
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eed to be. what most americans feel first when it comes to energy issues are prices they pay at the pump. we went through another spike in gas prices. people were not happy about it. the problem is that it happens every year. it happened last year and the ear before that. it is a serious blow to family budgets. it is coming right out of your pocket. every time it happens, politicians dust off their plans for two dollar gas, but nothing happens. that may go through the same cycle again. over the past four years, we have not just talked about it. we have started to do something about it. we work with companies to put in place the toughest fuel economy standards in history.
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what that means is that at the middle of the next decade, cars will go twice as far on a gallon of gas. he standards that we set are what is driving engineers and scientists working in labs. we have set achievable, but ambitious goals. in the middle of next decade, we expect you will fuel up and spend half as much. average family will save money at the pump. that is worth applauding. that is good news. [applause] a new report issued today show that america is becoming a global leader in advanced vehicles. you walk into any dealership today and you'll see twice as many hybrids to choose from as they were five years ago.
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seven times as many cars that can go 40 miles a gallon or ore. general motors sold more hybrid bugles than ever before. ford is selling some of the most fuel efficient cars. we are helping businesses succeed and we are creating good, middle-class jobs in america. so, we are making progress, but the only way to break this cycle of spiking gas prices is to shift our cars entirely off oil. that is why i called on congress to set up an energy security trust to fund research and the new technologies that will help us reach that goal.
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i would like to take credit for this idea because it is a good idea, but i cannot. basically my proposal builds up a proposal that was put forward by a nonpartisan coalition that includes retired generals and admirals and ceos. they came together around a simple idea -- much of our energy is drawn from lands and waters that we own together. but they proposed is to take some oil and gas revenue from public lands and put it toward research that will benefit the public. we can support american ingenuity without adding a dime to the deficit. we can support scientists that are designing new engines that are more energy efficient and developing cheaper batteries that can go farther on a single charge. support scientist and engineers that are devising new ways to fuel cars with advanced biofuels and natural gas.
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drivers can one day go coast to coast without using a drop of oil. it is not just about saving money. it is also about saving the environment. it is also about our national security. or military officials like general paul kelly, as is about national security. for business leaders, like the ceo of fedex, it was about economic security. when gas prices go up, it is harder to expand operations and create new jobs. these leaders say we need to fix this. this is not a democratic or
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republican idea. it is just a smart idea. we should be taking their advice. let's set up an energy security trust that helps us free our families and businesses from painful spikes in gas once and for all. e can do it. [applause] in the meantime, we will keep moving on the all of the above strategy that we have been working on for the last couple of years where we are producing more oil and gas at home, also producing biofuels. we are producing more solar power and wind power. we are working to make sure that here in america we are building cars and homes and businesses that waste less energy. e can do this.
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the nature of america's miraculous rise has been our drive, our spirit, our willingness to reach for new horizons, our willingness to take risks, our willingness to nnovate. we are not satisfied with how hings have been. we will try something that we might imagine now, but will achieve. that is the nature of america. that is what argonne national ab is about. that is what this facility is about. [applause] two decades ago, scientists at argonne led by mike -- where is he? [applause]
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mike started work on a rechargeable battery for ars. some folks at the time thought the idea was not worth it. he said if you have the technology, the car would cost a lot and would not go far enough. but mike and his team knew etter. they knew you could do better. and america, our federal government made it a priority. we funded those efforts. mike went to work. when others gave up, the team kept on at it. when development hit a snag, the team found a solution. they created a lithium battery that costs less and lasts onger.
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what was an idea two decades ago s now rolling off assembly lines in cutting edge comedy fuel efficient cars. 20 years ago or 20 years from now, we will be offering solutions to our problems that we cannot even comprehend. as long as the pipeline for research is maintained, as long as we recognize that we do together as a country -- and the private sector in its own will not invest in this research because it is too expensive. we cannot afford it.
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we have got to support it. we will all benefit from it. kids will benefit from it and our grandkids will benefit from it. that is who we are. that has been the american story. you do not stand still. we look forward. we turn new ideas into new industries. we change the way we can live our lives. that is how we sent a man to the moon. that is how we invented the internet. when someone tells us we can do, we say, we can. i'm confident that we will succeed as long as we do not lose that spirit of innovation and recognize we can only do it ogether. i will work as hard as i can every single day to make sure we do. congratulations, argonne. keep it up. god bless you. god bless america. [applause]
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cable satellite corp. 2013] national captioning institute] ♪ ♪
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♪ ♪
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[applause] >> next defense secretary chuck hagel announces the deployment
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of interceptor missiles on the west coast. then some of the speakers from the political action conference. >> the simple fact is we're getting older together and we're not not same -- our fertility rates have dropped and having an inverted pyramid. it makes our challenges as it relates to entitlements and social security even greater. japan and europe and russia and now china is starting to feel the impact of its one child policy. we're better off than the rest of the developed world but our fertility rate has dropped to 1.8, the lowest drop in recorded history. we have a try and true way to deal with this demographic time
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bomb. the path that we could take is to allow for a strategic reform of our immigration laws so we can bring young, aspirational people that will rebuild the demographic pyramid to make our entitlement secure and jump-start our economy in a way that would create an uplifting of our hopes and dreams. but also directly impact u.s. growth. >> former florida governor jeb bush on immigration wars part of book tv this weekend on c-span2. >> the pentagon will spend $1 billion to add 14 interceptor missiles to the west coast. defense secretary chuck hagel made this announcement during a briefing with the press core. he says she's he is to ensure
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protection. with the joint chiefs of staffs and defense under secretary for policy james miller. his is 25 minutes. >> good afternoon. i have a statement, and then i will take a couple of questions and ask the under secretary, the vice chief to address the specific questions you have about the topic that we will talk about. today, i am announcing a series of steps the united states will take to stay ahead of the challenge posed by iran and north korea development of long-range missile capabilities. the u.s. has missile defense
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systems in place to protect us from icbm tax, but north korea, in particular, has recently made advances in its capabilities and has engaged in a series of irresponsible and reckless situations. specifically, north korea announced last month it has conducted its third nuclear test this appears to be a road mobile icbm. also, it is using the taepodong-2 missile, demonstrating progress in their development of long-range issile technology. in order to bolster the protection of our homeland and state ahead of this threat, we are taking four steps. first, we will strengthen the homeland missile defense by deploying 14 additional ground-based interceptors at fort greeley, alaska. that will increase the number of
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ground-based interceptors from 30 to 44, including the four gbi's at vandenberg base in alifornia. this is nearly a fifth to% increase in air missile capability. second, with the support of the japanese government, we are planning to deploy additional adar in japan. the second radar will provide improved tracking of any missile launched in north korea at the united states or japan. hird, as directed by congress, we are conducting an environmental impact studies for an additional situation in the united states. was the administration is not made a decision on whether to proceed, conducting the impact studies will shorten the time line, should that decision be made. and fourth, we are restructuring
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the sm3-2b program. as many of you know, we plan to eploy the sm2. he timeline for deploying this was affected by recent cuts. they're also looking for advanced kill technology that will improve the performance of being gbi and other versions of the sm3 interceptor. we will be able to add protection for missiles from iran soon and provide additional protection from missiles of north korea. the nato missile defense.
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that remains on plan. the missile deployments the united states is making in three phases will be adapted with sites in poland and romania. we will also do as planned by 2018. the collective result of these of for your decisions will be for the to improve our ability to counter missile threats from iran and north korea while maximizing scarce taxpayer resources. the american people expect us to take every necessary step to protect their security at home and u.s. security strategic issues abroad, but they expect us to do so in the most efficient manner possible. by taking the steps i outlined today, we will strengthen our defense, maintain our commitments to our allies and partners, and make clear to the world that the united states stands firm. thank you.
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bob? >> mr. secretary, can you say with confidence that the ground-based interceptors in alaska will shoot down a north korean missile aimed at the u.s., given their test performance? >> well, as you know, there was an issue regarding our gyro system. as you probably know, we are going to further test this year. we have confidence in our system, and we certainly will not go forward with the additional 14 interceptors until we are sure we have the complete confidence we will need, but the american people should be assured that our interceptors are effective. >> when it? and do you believe this could be
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a deterrent against a country like north korea? >> well, we are looking at having all 14 interceptors in place by fiscal year 2017. the reason that we are doing what we are doing, and the reason we are advancing our program here for homeland security is do not take any chances, is to stay ahead of the threat, and to ensure any contingent's. that is why we made this decision that we have. >> secretary, in hindsight, was it a mistake to take the missile off-line and now having to spend the money to reactivate it? >> well, i'm going to ask either the vice chief or another to answer that question, because they have been through the process. i will take one more, and then we will get back.
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>> when north korea will have a >> when north korea will have a true, intercontinental ballistic missile. >> well, one of the reasons, again, we are doing what we are doing based on the intelligence we have is to assure that whenever there timelines are, we are not reacting to those timelines, that we are ahead of any timelines of any potential threat. we feel confident that to have the 30 in place now and the additional ones before the end of 2017 and that gives our country the security it needs, and people need to be assured that that security is there. let me ask the undersecretary and the vice chief to take your specific questions. thank you.
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>> can you be clear on one thing? deploying the additional 40 interceptors by 2017 is contingent on the defense agency approving that the warhead is verified and can hit a target. is that it? >> that is exactly right. we will continue to stick with our approach. as was noted before, the ce2 interceptor had a couple of test failures. we had a successful test flight on january 26. we are looking to go forward from that successfully, the interceptor test, in the coming months. the schedule is not yet set. we will be looking within this calendar year, and then going forward, we would be looking to make changes to those that are currently in place and then the
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new interceptors would also be ce2's. i think you talked to jim. he had very high confidence that we would be able to do this in a reasonable time frame. if i could also just take this opportunity to say whether the earlier decision to put a pause on this was a mistake. at the time, based on the intelligence assessment we had, it was a good bet. we received resources at the time, but at that time, the threat was uncertain. we did not know that we would see today what we are now, so it is a full concept of having a hedge and being prepared to go from 30 to 44 ground-based interceptors, recognizing the threat was uncertain and to implement it from 34 to 44. that is where we are today. >> what is the reaction from china and russia?
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and in japan and india? >> let me just say that, first, we have talked to the republic of korea and to the japanese, and they understand the rationale for this going forward, and the japanese and the secretary of indicated that they have agreed to move forward to improve our coverage for both the united states and japan. we have informed the chinese, and this point, we cannot characterize their reaction. >> did you consult with them or just inform them? >> we informed. >> sir, what about missiles that would defend the united states? i am curious about the american possessions in the western pacific, guam, those areas. will this affect those areas, to?
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>> not just the continental united states but all of the united states. >> the second in japan, is this the one that secretary leon panetta mentioned? >> that is correct. >> and endorse substantive question, also talking about an adversary. there is capability and intense. the secretary talked about this new capability we see the north korean testing, but how much of it is an assessment of the intentions of the new leader based on the incredibly hostile statements? >> the policy that we have four missile defense, particularly listed in the 2010 missile defense review, is to stay ahead of the threat in regards to north korea and iran. that means staying above where we think their capability is and is not contingent on any assessment.
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>> tom, there was a question about going about deterrence, and the fact of the matter is that the deterrence exists based on their objectives, and the other is the cost if deterrence fails, and i think the national security advisor made very clear in his speech that we not only intend to put mechanics and place for any potential north korean attempts to launch a missile to the united states, and we believe this ought to be deterred by that -- >> on the second intercept test, how soon will you know whether or not you'll be able to conducted by the end of the calendar year? >> the intent is essentially wanted to make sure we had a successful test this january before we proceeded. in fact, that test was extremely successful. we have a kill vehicle out there. it passed with flying colors. so now, the real deciding factor
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that will take us to conduct the next test against a target, testing another interceptor, both another kill vehicle, with the modifications that the national defense agency has made to fix the problem, so it is really just a question of doing that. we are acquiring the components and assembling it. that is a very technical piece of equipment to put together. >> can you talk about the estimated cost for this entire project and how this fits in with the sequester? also, this may be obvious, but i do not know, where the third gbs is. >> the cost of this step will include, first of all, additional funding for the missile field one, to complete that, and then for the additional interceptors, or, in fact, we will do is take test assets and bring them up to the standard and then replace them with additional gbi's, so there
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is another 14 ground-based interceptors because of this. very real numbers. overall, that is our best current estimate. >> they have delivered 53, and there are 70. >> as you know, the last test failed. there were a number of these in various stages of production, and that was halted. when we have a successful test, that will resume. those existing missiles on the production line would continue. i do not have the exact numbers on how many. we need to get the specifics on that. >> are you going to stop work
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anywhere else to fund this billions in the project? >> the funds that we will be requesting start in fiscal year 2014. it is part of the budget bill that we will be submitted to congress in the coming weeks. congress mandated three locations for a potential additional site in the united states, and they mandated that two be on the east coast, so the agency is currently assessing what locations on the east coast, and we will most likely have the third be where we have interceptors. >> you cannot be more specific? >> not yet. >> obviously, it is a question of regional interest. will this program announced today have an effect for plans for a site in poland's?
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>> it will have no impact on that. we will go forward as planned with the first three phases of the european phased approach, employing about 23 interceptors, sm3 interceptors, same time on, same footprint, with u.s. forces to support that, and as the secretary said, the same coverage. >> to that same point, did not the secretary say that you were saving some money on that? >> that is correct. the prior plan had four phases. the third was about interceptors in poland, and we will continue with the phases one at route 3. additional, other types of interceptors would have been added. we no longer intend to add them
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to the mix, but we plan to have the same number of deployed interceptors with the coverage for all of nato europe. >> the upshot is that the europeans will see no difference in their ballistic missile defense. the phase four was about continuing defense of europe but also being able to extend that defense to part of the united states. it turns out that by doing what we are announcing today, and remember, phase four was not going to appear until 2020 to or beyond, but the threats are growing faster. we are going to get better defense of the united states and get it a lot sooner, so it makes
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complete sense to do this. >> sir, you said this threat is going faster. can you expand on what we are talking about here? >> particularly with north korea, but we are also keeping a close eye on the iranians. last april, we saw a parade in p'yongyang that had mixed accounts of whether they were real or fake missiles, and we have also seen a third nuclear test recently. obviously, without getting into intelligence aspects, we watch this very, very closely. as you know, at the beginning of this missile defense attorney, we knew that we would have to be potentially adaptive, so we have continuously build this hedge that we could select if the threat either goes faster or slower than we thought, so the korean threat went a little bit faster than we expected, so we pulled the tools off of the shelf. >> let me just add to what the admiral said. >> do you know that that's kno8,
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whether it has the range to reach the united states? >> we probably want to avoid the intelligence aspects of that, but we believe and probably does have the range to reach the united states, and where it exists is something else, too. >> the nuclear test. has the u.s. been able to confirm that that was, in fact, a nuclear test, and if so, was it a uranium device or a plutonium device? >> i would not want to get into that. >> to japan, when do you expect to deploy it? >> we continue to build and deploy additional sm3 interceptors. we are moving from deployment.
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with japan, the number of those interceptors will continue to grow, and that will be true, including our continued efforts for the pacific. you will see a growing number of sm3 interceptors. with respect to the timeline, we are in conversations with the japanese government about precisely when that can be accomplished, and at this point, i would say it is a matter of the least some months. >> with what we have over there, do we expect more? >> the exact number of bmd capable, on my fingertips, it is about five. the doctor really hit the point on that.
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this is about filling the tubes rather than the number of ships. >> this scale back to europe, does that in any way affect -- abilitiesity is? ? >> no, not at all. >> on the deterrence issue, can you tell the public why they should have any confidence in the system, given that it has not had successes since 2008? >> yes, we have two types. there is being ce1 and the ce2. we have successfully tested them. we have confidence in that missile, and we are going to test it again, and as congress said we should continue to keep
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testing these missiles. in the meantime, we wanted to improve it, so we developed what is called the ce2, and there are upgrades to it. what we discovered is that it was vulnerable -- it was something we could not test on the ground. it was something we can only test in space, and missile defense has done a great job of thoroughly looking at that problem and has tested that missile, and it has performed beautifully, and we have a lot of confidence. even the ce2, if it is successful this fall, we will have to test it.
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and americans should have faith in that mosul and that we can defend ourselves against a potential north korean threat as it exists today. that threat as it evolves, and also against iranian threats. we are going to flight test it and hopefully do it after we build it this fall. >> do you have any initiative in your mind to bolster this? >> we have had very strong bilateral discussions, as you know, with both japan and south korea, and we have begun to initiate some discussions, as well. we will see where this will go. there is value pursuing that. >> and clarification of coverage. how much of the united states will be covered by these interceptors? >> the entire united states. >> as far as iran and north korea are concerned, with their missile system, these two countries -- >> that is a good question. it is an intelligent question, and we are not going to answer it today. >> what will be the chinese reaction? >> i will not predict that.
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i hope they understand that we need to take the steps necessary to defend ourselves against potentially emerging threats from iran and north korea. it is important for us to stay ahead of that, and we are taking prudent steps. >> thank you. >> thank you. [captions copyright national cable satellite corp. 2013] [captioning performed by national captioning institute] >> as found the hitting history by accident. history" byden accident. a friend pointed out to me , youal years ago and said
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know alexandria was part of the original district of columbia? i thought that was intriguing. since that time, i was kicking around what would be a good project to look at that time. and what is now arlington, part of the district of columbia. what i was there to research for the book, i found two places i would like to take you, to give you a sense of what it was like to live in alexandria, d.c. once the the park where you will find the originally -- original boundary marker for the southernmost tip. then a dueling ground for where -- and do well took place -- duel took place with henry clay. union army invaded alexandria. one of the first places they came was here. .t was an infamous spot
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when the union soldiers came here, they came to the basement where we are standing, and there were slaves shackled to the wall here where we are standing. >> this weekend, more from alexandria, virginia as book tv, and c-span's local content vehicles look behind the scenes at the history and literary life of alexandria, virginia. saturday at noon, eastern on c- span two's book tv. in a historic speech before the european parliament on tuesday, israeli president shimon peres said i run wants to .uild a nuclear weapon he also discussed the eu's relationship with israel and the ongoing efforts for peace in the middle east. his speech comes one week before
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visit to obama's israel. this is about 45 minutes. the president of the state of israel. [applause] >> dear colleagues, ladies and thatemen, i am very happy
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today i can welcome the president of israel, shimon peres, to the european parliament in strasbourg. , deara great honor for us president, that you have come to speak to us today and share your experiences and your hope for the future with us. between european and israeli citizens these days, it is a very strong link. we wish to build on that link, by way of your visit today. in the future, we have close economic and cultural ties. they have come about. we also know there are many .ersonal ties which enrich us but also a painful history, which binds us. the european union and israel
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both have arisen after the terrors of the second world war and the experiences of the depths of human experience, namely the holocaust. builtope, men and women on the ruins of the war and swore never again to experience that. , never again,rds which guides may, as a german member of this house, and it is to be ahonor for me member of this multinational house. iese words, never again, think are our most important duty for now and the future. the fight against anti-semitism , against exclusion, against that is the
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foundation of the european union. whose parliament was hidden -- we sit in. [applause] and the right to exist right to its people to live in security and peace, that is not negotiable. we as europeans and myself as a german in particular, stand behind that principle. i, of course, wish that there had been progress in the middle east peace robison our last meeting. unfortunately, that is not the case. there is not a peace initiative at the moment. just like the israeli people, they have the right to live in
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dignity and peace. neither the israelis nor have lived people any great length of time and peace. we would all like to see both living side-by-side in two democratic countries with peace and prosperity and secure borders. in 1993, you wrote in your own book, a new middle east, and you set out what your vision would be for the future of your region. middle east, which flourishes links ands reconciliations between people by way of economic cooperation, i was your ambition. some people call you naïve back then. here in this house, we call you courageous. you have the same visionary courage is the founding far as -- founding fathers the european
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union had. we share your hope that the european -- the middle east will become a peaceful and aggressive region in the future and we will support you in that end. so president, welcomed the european parliament and we are looking for to listening to what you have to say. [applause] >> the president of the european union, dear friends, distinguished members of the european parliament, of this
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great house of freedom and peace that has changed the history of europe and affecting the future of the entire world. i want to thank you for this privilege. an important a opportunity and a meaningful location for the people of israel. thank you very much. i stand here before you, burning with burning memories in my heart, and great hope in my soul. i carry profound pain, concerning the past, and i look with great confidence to the future.
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i emigrated to israel in 1934 at 1942, most of in the inhabitants of my town were burned alive. my family delay their , if they hadn't, we would have been exterminated. before the declaration of israel in 1947, i was in the hot and headquarters. since then, i have been -- it many times inked its existence. we are outnumbered, outgunned. we have just one choice before
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us. to win or to die. in theparticipated confrontation of another enemy, the desert. .e remain the desert bloom that imany memories carry many dreams as well. -- i can tome continue my dreams. people age, dreams are ageless. , ichanged, europe changed can't express our admiration for .he changes europe picked itself up in the wake of the world's war.
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it created a new world. europe. had a united witheplaced military camps and take compasses. i know that you are facing an but your skies, are without the clouds of war. country introduced the nobel prize. mistake byected its building a better world. europe is becoming the
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europe of support of our renaissance. israel was born on european soil. in the past 1000 years, more jews lived in europe than in any other continent in the world. more jews were murdered in europe in the last 100 years than in the preceding 2000 years. the world's tragedy of our history. dreams and rebelled the same time. people were murdered here by starvation, gas, rifles, and fire.
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all that remains of them as ashes. we shall not forget that the righteous among the nations, your people, carried handles of light in the darkness. they were small in number, but great in heroism. israel was born from these ashes. the end of the second world war. somebody stood up then, and said within three years, a state would be created, it would've been considered a delirious visionary. became atreams reality. -- these dreams became a reality. if somebody would have stood up on the same day and said that in six short years, a new, united
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europe would be born, [indiscernible] six countries signed the treaty , became a community of 27 nations across europe. our relations here and now are a dialogue between two americas. -- two miracles. your miracle, and our miracle. close ties with the european union. i have come to thank you for your friendship based on common values.
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politically, [indiscernible] religiously, this is the cradle of the three monotheistic religions. scientifically, israel is advanced, even by european standards. .srael is small .t's soil is burned , there are just too dubbed lakes, one dead, the the land is rich in
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archaeology, poor in natural resources. best resources the human potential. , where the people enriched the land more than the land enriched the people. an example, the devotion of the people and the merits of high- tech deserts to surrender to bloom. we went through seven wars. we won them. ,ut when peace became possible we returned other lands which we won during the war, to the countries that we made peace with, egypt. we started a piece assess with the palestinian people. the palestinian
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authority. ,hen, the evacuated gaza strip we dismantled 22 settlements, and drawback the settlors from them. it was an occasion for the palestinians to build a strip of independence, of peace. unfortunately, they turned it into a terrorist base. we don't know why, we don't know what for. a setbackw it became back to the peace process. israel is an island in a stormy ocean. , weave to defend our island
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have an interest to tranquilize. some claim it will take europe has proved a great events can be achieved in six years. a new era where events are moving at the speed the plane, no longer speed of a carriage. i believe that peace can be achieved in a relatively short while. the peace process of the palestinians has already agreed in the beginning and agreed on a solution. based on the two israel leaving,
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in peace and economic cooperation. the remaining dispute issues can and should be negotiated and completed. is not just al strategic choice. it is a moral core with stems from the death -- depth of our heritage. [indiscernible] are considered born equal. -- legacy calls upon , whoher with my partner was assassinated, we laid down the foundation for peace with the palestinians. it is time now to continue.
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.o renew the peace process we must continue to work with the palestinian authorities. we have to support the palestinian economy. a palestinian security forces formed.- force was and that we work together with them to prevent terror and crime. ladies and gentlemen, our hand to peacetretched out with all the countries in the middle east. , a new israelie government will be formed. it is an occasion to resume the peace negotiations. to realize the two state solution.
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fore is no other solution the palestinian store for us. for us.alestinians or it is the present reality. , we israel and palestine find yourselves in a similar situation. dangers, each of them separately. call fore dangers collective security. i have the highest regard for the king of [indiscernible] the courageously committed king to be. i have known the president of the palestinian authority for many years.
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and is a realrror partner to peace. has been and continues to be and ar partner for peace major enemy of terror. , we shall be hosting president obama in israel as a welcome and esteemed test. his support for our security is devotionnary and his to peace is unshakable. we are glad that the united states and europe are now working together to support peace, to stop terror. the greatest danger to peace in the world today is the present iranian regime.
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it came cloaked in a religious mantle. it developed an impossible appetite. , iran threatens iran threatens others. it endangers the independence of the arab countries. it smuggles arms from many countries, in order to undermine the stability. , theyenied the holocaust call for another holocaust. they are aiming to build a nuclear weapon and deny they do it. in the hands of an irresponsible regime, is an imminent danger to the entire
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world. the european union and the united states through the conclusions together to create a policy to stop this from happening. , you rightly decided to impose economic sanctions. you made it clear that if the iranians will not respond, other options are on the table. in addition to the nuclear bomb, iran is constructing long-range missiles equipped with nuclear warheads. they can reach the far corners of the world, including europe. i believe that in addition to controlling the production of highly enriched uranium, there is a need to control the means
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of delivery. to control the production of missiles capable of carrying nuclear warheads. the production and the use of nuclear arms -- why do famous of capabilities -- why do the missile capabilities need to carry nuclear warheads? the conference that took place in 1975, the united dates -- states placed the issue of human rights at the top of the world's strategies. it was surprising, it was effect of. it shows that one voice is no less important ma.
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atay, this call should be rest. a clear voice must be raised. against the violation of human .ights i the iranian regime a clear voice must be raised against a regime that hangs people without bringing them to court. that throws people into resin without trial. att fires live bullets civilian demonstrators without respect for their life. a clear voice must be raised against the regime that discriminates against women, and of sharing with their money one, they spend
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terror and endanger people all around the world. [indiscernible] will encourage the iranian people in their fight for freedom. .een there fight against misery the elections will take place in .ran they should not be allowed to falsify the results. to make their own free choice. your voice will show the iranian people that the world is not turning its back on them. they are violating the charter with the united nations which condemns the violation of human
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rights, aggression against other countries. they are given the opportunity and united nations to abuse its platform. iran supports terrorism throughout the world. its main proxy, hezbollah -- 0-- it's been proxy is a threat to the entire region. agreementhe historic between france and england gave way to a modern lebanon, so to become a multicultural come where muslims, christians, and jews, together
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with in peace. , hezbollah is destroying lebanon. , not a terror organization a political movement. they collect missiles. they are trigger-happy. they hide missiles in peaceful towns and villages. and by doing so, they turn them into a war target. .t divides lebanon politically it turns the land into scorched land. it is a state within a state. they send soldiers to support the massacre of the bloody
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dictator in syria. 20 terror attempts by them were counted all around the world. in india, thailand, georgia, south africa, united states, greece, among others. last month, the government of bulgaria, and member of the european union, identified that [indiscernible] cyprus recently arrested a terrorist planning a terror attack. distinguished members of
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, called terror terror. save lebanon from terrorist madness. save civilian people from the iran forces. save your citizens and hours from them. -- they are a terrorist organization. [indiscernible] previousar behind its limitations. if they succeed, to recover from
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the past. seeing a brave attempt of the african people to build a new science-based economy like in .urope create they cannot stand by us they impose this on the world. they cannot stand by when the massacre called out by the syrian president against his own thele, his own children. nuclear installation was destroyed in time. the chemical arsenal remains in .is hands to this very day
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it is a terrible danger for the syrian people, the entire region and even for europe. to prevent the chemical weapons from falling into the wrong hands, the best option to put an end to the syrian tragedy might be achieved by empowering the arab leaders, of which syria is a member. [indiscernible] they can and should form a provisional government in syria to stop the massacre, to prevent syria from falling to pieces. the united nations should to buildhe arab league
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a force in blue helmets. came to send the association agreement between the european union and israel. that reality has surpassed expectations. , this partnership became a friendship. this ground that i propose to the european union and israel to cooperate for the benefit of the stability and prosperity in the middle east. the developing and other
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places in the world. israel is described as a start up nation. i believe the whole middle east .an become a start up region high-tech incubators can be created all over the region to escape poverty. , so we tried to take advantage of our smallness. small countries can become great. aday we are trying to build social modem that will bridge the gap between the haves and the have-nots. the gap is the major problem. rich and poor. we are looking for a new way to gap helps fight
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,emocrat position communication, education, reducing the cost of food and housing. this is a burning need for the younger generation. itis nice to be young, but is extremely expensive. we intend to improve the human condition, enable each person aok -- person to possess choice for the way of life by [indiscernible] . the brain is the most illustrious instrument of the world. it has enabled us to build
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artificial brains. we are still far away from understanding the ways the brain is functioning. as a matter of fact, we are strangers to ourselves. discovering the mechanism of our brain will enable us to become and withwith ourselves our fellow man. i am glad that israel gained a , the cooperation between our governments, nongovernmental organizations and between us as individuals. our global world is no global government. it has become almost ungovernable. way tove that the future
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governing will rely on three pillars. national government will continue to be in charge of the .usbandry of the national state global companies will invest in , andrch and development the individual will enjoy the capacity to govern themselves by knowing the way the brain functions. science today is more telling than politics. it is universal. it is borderless. armies cannot conquer wisdom. police cannot arrest science. i believe the scientific aid to developing countries can enable them to escape poverty.
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science-based global companies can change the world. --balization will and racism end racism. not be global and racist. do not imposees their wills upon people. on the contrary. they respect the will of their clients. they can provide scientific wars.ow for and can assist young people to , toire higher education create jobs fitting their skills. this may be the best help we can offer our young people. , inhe younger generation the arab world, this is our hope.
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the challenge of the new age. i propose a plan of a joint venture between the european union, the national governments, the global corporation, to work in a new way on these challenges. pages and gentlemen -- ladies and gentlemen, it will require your support as the european parliament. allow me to pound and your understanding. joining europe's wisdom and the israeli experience, we can overcome tomorrow's challenges. facing a lack of a global " or ament, we can force between governments and local companies.
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which the dangers threaten the values for which we we shall fight relentlessly. esteemed members of parliament, the father of the european union, everybody is ambitious. question is whether he is or to do.to be the time has come to do. but just remember that we are as great as the purpose we serve. the challenges ahead of us are great. -- who better to define defiant this seemingly
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impossible than the two miracles i have mentioned? , israel, to union fulfill the teachings of our heritage. in the world of my in the world of my forefathers, i can say let's do it. let us work together for better middle east. let us fulfil the values of our people, peace, democracy, human rights, yielding to no obstacle, we shall be servants of the future.
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i am filled with hope. and determination. , we shall build a brighter tomorrow for the tomorrow generation. i thank you. shalom. [applause]
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>> many thanks, ladies and whichmen, for the way in you honored the president of israel. thank you, mr. president, for what you had to say to us. he made tohe appeal us will echo beyond this chamber.
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i welcome your remarks about cooperation between the people of israel and the people of europe. i welcome the fact that you refer to our common values, the , andct for the individual the non-negotiable question of human rights for all people in europe, in israel, and also in palestine. this is a principle that applies throughout the world. thank you very much. [applause]
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>> >>, speakers during today's conservative in political action conference, including former gov. jeb bush, senator kelly ayotte, and wayne lapierre of the national rifle association. on the next "washington talksl," al cardenas about the future and challenges of the conservative manager -- a movement. then how advocacy groups are shifting from winning campaigns to advocating for policy. then the national parks and conservation association, we will discuss the impact of cuts on a national parks across the country. "washington journal" is live 7 in eastern every day on c-span. >> the public is not paying as much attention as i am and you are and those of us who are part
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of this political community. i call the political community is probably about 10 men -- 10 million people. it is the people that watched c- , theyfox news, msnbc, cnn care about politics a lot. what, 120 million voters? think aboutple washington and politics as background noise. the background noise comes pretty much from the mainstream forming an opinion foxmitt romney and obama -- news does not reach most of those people. the box gets great ratings. it has a loyal audience. -- billthe shows
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gets the most ratings each night. the concerted -- conservative media only reaches a tiny chunk of the audience. >> more with fred barnes sunday night at 8:00 on c-span's "q&a." >> jeb bush was the keynote speaker of the see pak ronald reagan dinner. ronald reagan dinner. his remarks were about 20 minutes. >> thank you guys. thank you very much. thank you all. thank you for that kind introduction.
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if everyone in the back of stop chattering. that is the best introduction i've gotten in a long while. i want to particularly thank my old friend, by longevity, al for his selfless dedication to the conservative cause. it is a pleasure to be here tonight honoring one of america's best presidents, ronald reagan. i would like to begin by expressing my deep thanks for the thoughts about my dad. away so aptly said, put the hearts. he is back at home. he is doing on. -- well. that is the good news. [applause] that is the good news. the bad news is, he is no longer pampered by the nurses at memorial hospital in houston.
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he has a new caregiver. her name is barbara bush. she is really tough. [applause] you see, this is true that no matter what your age, even if you were the leader of the free world, life has a way of keeping us humble. sometimes, we even get to cross the thin line between humbling and downright humiliating. peterle of weeks ago, handy tweeted a picture of me from 1970, with what appeared to be a catcher's mitt on my head. bytill have that sportcoat the way. he felt compelled to comment on my hairstyle and said that i was wearing a mullet. i responded of course that it was not a mullet. just an unruly set of hair in 1970. we all had that. his response was even better. there is a party in the front, and a party in the back.
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[laughter] i found his comment strangely relevant to us tonight because as you think about it, the same could be said about the republican party. we used to be the party in the front. after the last election, we are the party in the back. the question is, how do we get to be the party in the front again? that's what i would like to talk about tonight. how do we start to elect republican presidents in the mold of the great man we honor tonight? before we answer that question, i would like to share some things that i have observed recently. although you may know, it was a joy. in 2007, i have been involved in education reform. the've taken me around globe. i travel a lot. i have seen firsthand the expose of economic growth in places like china, singapore, and brazil.
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in some of their cities on any given day, you can see dozens of skyscrapers. when i return home, the mood is different. different, and worse. americans have the sense that our recovery is fragile. the greatest prosperity in a century will be enjoyed by other people in other lands, and not by our own children. tonight, i am here to tell you that this conclusion is 100% wrong. we potentially find ourselves at the threshold of our nations greatest century. we can, as reagan did, restore the great confidence of american progress and growth and optimism. tonight, as surely as you sit here, the fundamental are aligning in a way.
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it is there for the taking if we have the courage to grab it. and push the only problem that divide us today. consider the facts. take energy, with our new drilling technology, america will soon have an energy surplus. this is trillions of dollars in new wealth for americans. trillions of dollars. a foreign-policy not overly influenced by oil. how about food? america will be the saudi arabia of grain in a century when the world is clamoring for more food. just as crude oil determines the wealth and power of nations in the latter part of the last century, we will do so in this century. rapid advances are transformed at a breathtaking pace. manufacturing jobs that were shipped to china a decade ago
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are now returning to america. beingime, the work is performed by our robots. the good news is, there are robots built in america by american workers. by low energy cost, they create a new wave of energy manufacturing in this country. classes of diseases are on the verge of being eradicated by manipulating individual molecules on the surfaces of living sales. -- living cells. never getting lost, never having accidents, already a prototype car has driven more than 3000 miles in the maze of california without a single accident. 3-d printing machines are being developed and down skill for home use that will allow you to instantly create thousands of objects at the touch of a button. already, cars are being designed and built that are being printed by a computer. how about our youthful
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potential? as a nation, if we get immigration right, we are going to stay young. by 2050, china will have more old people that america has people. america remains younger than all industrialized nations. these are but a few of our vintages, and collectively, they point to a century of prosperity and world leadership that is unparalleled in the world's history. there is a very dark cloud on the horizon. all of these advantages are at risk if the federal government continues on its art of irresponsibility. our spending addiction and the lackluster public education are the two greatest impediments to achieving our potential in this century. conservatives have those solutions to these problem's. liberals have the proposals that will only make them worse.
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i know, i balance our budget for eight years. while cutting taxes every year. i have dedicated much of my adult life to revolutionize our schools so that school serves children and parents. you must know this, all of our successes at the state level, and all of the work being done in the private sector can be undone if we continue to lose presidential elections. we will forfeit our ability to chart a better future for our republic. this would be tragic in every sense of the world. as you know, sam is the former ceo of ibm. probably the best ceo in america in the last decade. human also a fantastic being. he's easy to talk to, but he is also a visionary and a true leader. he told me an amazing story. he was deeply involved with assembling the team that created watson, a supercomputer
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that can understand natural language with all the ambiguities associated with human speech. watson can read through more than 200 pages of text to find an answer in less than three seconds. what you do when you have this kind of amazing capability at your fingertips? do you know what watson is doing today? it is saving lives. it is being used in research hospitals like sloan care to diagnose and suggest treatment options for cancer patients. they are able to look at available information, listen closely, and make critical medical recommendations without the personal biases that afflict mere mortals. the thing that astounds me is that watson can learn from his past mistakes. in every decision, it helps the
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next decision to be more accurate. the first round of jeopardy ended with watson tied for first place with $5,000 $5,000 in winnings. by the time the second match ended, watson had one over $77,000 and ken jennings at only 124 grand. a little scary, right? i wonder what watson would say if it brought that computing power to bring to bear on the political future of the republican party. first, watson would probably know that republicans lost the popular vote in five of the last six presidential elections. in those elections, it would be good to point out the democrat candidates received 26 million more votes than our publican candidates. there's a staggering number. how how could it be? if watson was to read the blogs, tweets, facebook posts that mention the republican party, it would find that all too often, we are associated
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with being anti-everything. way too many people believe republicans are anti-immigrant, anti-woman, anti-science, anti- gay, anti-worker, and the list goes on and on. many voters are simply unwilling to choose our candidate, even though they share our core beliefs, because those voters feel unloved, unwanted, and unwelcome in our party. tonight, my thought is this. if watson can learn from its past mistakes, so can we. this means that we must move beyond the devices and issues that currently define the public debate. never again, never again can the republican party simply write off entire segment of our society because we assume our principles have limited appeal. they have broad appeal. [applause] they have broad appeal. we need to be larger than that.
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reasonexactly the same that millions of immigrants were drawn from our shores from every nation, we need to draw into our party people from every corner of society, because conservative principles and not liberal dogma best reflect the ideals that made this nation great. we must be united in the principle that everyone should be given the opportunity to rise to the top, to raise a family, and to be free read our core principles, greater risk on civility, more personal freedom, smaller and more effective government are the nly pretzels -- principles that can offer our children the measure of their potential in american centuries. i meant to tell you there is no us or them. the face of the republican party needs to be the face of every american. we need to be the party of inclusion and acceptance. [applause] it is our heritage, and our future, and we need to cancel our efforts in those terms.
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as republicans, we need to be re-acquainted with the idea that relationships that really matter are not made through twitter, or social media, real relationships take time to grow. they begin with a genuine interest in the stories, the hopes, the dreams, any challenges harvard within each of us. -- a complete stranger to me, stood up a town hall meeting challenge me to help children like hers. i'm sure i said something pleasant in response. it wasn't good enough for murphy. she would not let me up for air. over the next month, i traveled and talked to parents who fear nothing more than having their disabled child outlive them and become a ward of an uncaring
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state. imagine what it would be like to be a mom or a dad of a child him and your biggest worry would be that you would die before they did and no one would take care of them. when i became governor, we had a renewed focus on helping the developing disabled. elevating their lives, i found out that we would help all for radiant. we used to be the party who understood small connections. we need to be that party again. we speak to people and make the case for conservative, the happy exception does not always approve the rule. it is a high validation if we can only point to the increasingly rare individual who overcomes adversity and succeeds in. here is a reality. if you are fortunate enough to count yourself among the privileged, much of the rest of the nation is drowning. in our country, if you are born
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poor, if your parents to go to college, if you do not know your father, if your english is not spoken to her home, the outs are stacked against you. you're more likely to stay poor today than any time since world war ii. lastreat tragedy of the decade is that liberals have channeled the anger and frustration that comes from this dynamic and use it as an opportunity to tax the very ideas of success at cell. -- success itself. in their view, anyone who is climbing to the top one percent, or top 20% for that matter has created some form of social breach. they deserve our scorn. nohout innovation, we will longer move forward as a nation. so our central mission as conservatives is to reignite social and economic mobility in this country.
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it is called the right to rise. very facets to our mission. let me briefly mention for. first, we need to reestablish america the idea that success is a good thing. rather than being viewed with this distaste and suspicion. [applause] success desperately needs to be cool again. we need to offer the citizens of our nation role models who demonstrate that success isn't about taking, it is about creating something where nothing before existed. it is about the way wealth ripples. second, we need to equip every child with the best tools to rise. every child in america deserves the best education on the planet. why not? after all, we are already paying for it. yet, our kids frequently rank the bottom in math and
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science scores. we need to have the leader and the authority to put that in place. -- it may save the lives of millions. the tragedy is that for every child that reaches their full abilities of the builds that watson, there are hundreds who could've done the same thing i'm about are stuck in failing and in different schools. we are squandering america's greatest resource. only reform minded conservatives have ability to stop the single greatest waste of human potential in my mind in the history of the world. [applause] -- and rewards improvement and
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excellence. a culture based on empowering parents with abundance of choices for education. a deep understanding of the transformative power of digital learning. government should create a level playing field. it should maximize the opportunities for the players, and then step back. this does not mean the government plays no role. does mean that government does not pick winners and losers are create such huge costs that only the large can comply. [applause] finally, we need to realize that each of us has a far greater role to play as a private citizen and as part of a government or as its credit.
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there is a political realm and the social realm. we should not confuse the two. we should not rely on bureaucracy to instill virtues. government should build. thehould fill holes in heart. as conservatives, we should realize the limits of appreciate aand roles of parents, churches, as role models. we can do so much more by setting an example. we need to be out in our communities, mentoring our children, demonstrating the generosity, compassion, and human potential. asee our path forward conservatives. i believe the future is extraordinarily bright. i will and where i started. as for the rumors to the desert -- to the demise of the conservative movement, as my dad
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said, put away the harps. we have within our grasp the means by which our country will regain its momentum, leavitt's imprint on this remarkable century, and secure a better century for all. god bless you all. thank you for coming. [applause] >> among the speakers at the annual conference, new hampshire senator kelly ayotte. she discussed changing the tax code, and because deacons -- consulate attack, and the danger nuclear program. this is about 20 minutes.
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♪ >> good morning. how're you doing today? excellent. i want to thank representative t is for the kind introduction. i am so pleased to be here today. mylso want to thank colleague, senator mitch mcconnell, for his strong conservative leadership in the united states senate, advancing republican values. [applause] today at aere watershed moment for america. facing greats challenges. wonder, wills
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america continue to be, as ronald reagan so eloquently described it, a shining city on a hill? there is so much that keeps me up at night. let me tell you about some of those things. too many americans are out of work. federal regulations are strangling businesses. obamacare is increasing health care costs and stopping so many of those businesses from hiring, and i come from small business family -- i know what that is like, how hard our smaller businesses work. we have a broken tax code. [applause] the president and senate democrats, they just want to keep increasing taxes, making it
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harder and harder for our small businesses to hire and grow and put people to work in this country. .ur nation is drowning in debt and we have had a four straight years of $1 trillion deficits. will tell you all why i ran for office -- i am blessed to be the mother of two wonderful b.ildren here, kate and jaco what is happening in washington, it is not just that we continue to spend money that we do not have, but we are essentially robbing our children of the american dream.
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[applause] i know that you have heard at this important conference about these fiscal challenges, and you have heard it from great leaders who have spoken before me, and you will hear it from great leaders who will speak after me. that we needthem to fix this kissell mess that we are in. right,o not get this then america's greatness is truly endangered. today i want to speak with threatut another great that our nation faces. this is an issue that truly keeps me up at night, and that
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is to the security of our nation. [applause] i have a simple question for all you -- howall of many of you believe that radical islam as a threat to our way of life? [applause] raise your hands if you believe that. i agree. i am deeply concerned with what is happening around the world. lead, wea fails to will create a vacuum that will empower extremists and make america less safe.
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let's start with the ayatollah in iran. iran is the largest state sponsor of terrorism. violent deported a extremists in iraq, afghanistan who have killed our troops. the regime becomes a violent terrorist organizations such as has a lot and hamas -- hezbollah and hamas. iran supplies training and supplies to bashar al-sadr so he can use those weapons to murder his own people. that calledregime our country in the great satan. look at the recent activities. they just announced they were building thousands of new centrifuges at an underground
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uranium facility. believe thatou they are enriching all of this nuclearfor peaceful power or medical isotopes? i do not believe it either. if me tell you what happens iran gets a nuclear weapon. certainly be an arms race in the middle east, because the sunni-arab countries will not allow the shi'a- persians to have a nuclear weapon unless they have the same capability. a nuclear arms race in the world's most volatile region would be like lighting a match in a tinderbox.
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all.is my biggest fear of it is not that iran will put a nuclear weapon on the end of the missile. my biggest fear is that they will give at this nuclear technology to a terrorist organization. [applause] what have we seen from the obama administration? obama administration is sending the worst signal to the ayatollah at a most critical time. we talk. they enrich. they do not take us seriously. this leading from behind strategy, it is not working. think about the message we are
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sending. ignored the president the advice of his commanders, his own commanders, and rushed to the exits. what was the result? al qaeda is making a comeback in iraq. iran has become an important player in iraq. syria, we sat on the sidelines while over 70,000 circassians were slaughtered -- syrians were slaughtered, exceeding our power to the vetoes of the russians and chinese in the united nations to a bunch of bureaucrats. afghanistan, the president has undercut his commanders time and time again. the administration
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again and led from behind and never took steps to secure the weapons stash. do you know where those weapons are now? they are in the hands of islamic radicals in mali, egypt, and by terrorists to harm us and our allies. this administration has repeatedly undercut israel. how do you think our strong ally israel feels that one of the most critical times in the history of this country? israel, this is life or death. have said they want to wipe israel off the map.
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israel has rightly vowed, never again. [applause] osama bin laden is dead. [applause] we are glad about that. make no mistake -- al qaeda is very much alive. yet what has this administration's response been in the last week when we captured osama bin laden's son- in-law, captured him overseas? let's understand to this individual is. this is a man who was sitting next to osama bin laden the day after september 11, the attack on our country that murdered so many americans. he is sitting next to him, he
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filmed, and do you know what he said then it? he threatened, the storm sean not stop, especially the airplane storm. children, muslims, and opponents of the united states not to board any aircraft and not to live in high-rises. he is linked to the murder of at least one of our marines in an attack in kuwait against us and our allies, and after he spent time with osama bin laden, he fled, and guess where? iran. he is charged with conspiring to kill americans. instead of taking this foreign terrorist to holding him in, military detention, what does the administration do? they bring him to new york city, right where our country was
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attacked. they brought him to a civilian court. they gave him a lawyer. they told him, and you have the right to remain silent. it is shameful. kind ofl he were some common criminals who robbed a bank. -- if he were some kind of common criminal who robbed a bank. we all know how many years it took to gain the intelligence to capture osama bin laden. how much information was lost when this administration led -- read this terrorist his miranda rights? [applause] this it is clearly a political decision by our attorney general and not a decision based on gathering intelligence and
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protecting our great country. what is the answer to where we find ourselves at a dangerous time? share some of the insights from one of our greatest presidents, a very frequent speaker at cpac, ronald reagan. [applause] when president reagan sought evil in the world, he was not afraid to confront it. famously when he went to berlin and called president gorbachev to tear down this wall. it is very hard to imagine our current president standing up to
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ine world believes -- bullies the way president reagan did. can you imagine that? i certainly cannot. fromhow far we have fallen president reagan's legacy. our allies feel uncertain, and our enemies feel emboldened. that is what happens when we lead from behind. i can the best examples tell you of leading from behind is what happened in benghazi. [applause] the mainstream media did not want to talk about that. including americans, our ambassador, were murdered by terrorists. had ou imagine if this
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happened under the bush administration? would this not have been a huge story? absolutely, not a doubt in my mind. aat happened in benghazi is serious national security failure. [applause] clear.e the administration did not and still does not want to come clean with the facts. however, we did push in congress, and what did we learn? we learned that secretary of state hillary clinton never even saw the cables from her own ambassador that said very clearly that the consulate could not withstand a coordinated attack.
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she said that she never saw cables describing the prior attacks on the consulate. she claims that she never knew about requests for additional security from her own people, from our people, on the ground she saidn agency, yet in her senate testimony that she was clear eyed about the risks in libya. clear eyed? how could she possibly say that she was clear eyed when she never even reviewed the cables from her own ambassador? it is outrageous. [applause] how could it be that on september 11, of all days, when we think about the vigilance we
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should have on september 11, that we were unable to provide military assistance to our fellow americans that were under attack when the attack occurred over seven hours? how is that? because we would not let this go, and we still will not let this go -- [applause] what did we learn? we learned that this was not a spontaneous reaction to hateful video. we now know that ambassador susan rice house explanation was simply false. explanation was simply false. we also know that the president explanation to the american people for nearly two weeks after this attack was absolutely wrong.
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[applause] unfortunately, we still have not gotten all the answers about what happened, but i wanted to know that we will keep pushing, i will keep pushing to get to the bottom of this debacle. [applause] that weou here today never let another tragedy like this happen again. -- vow here today that we never let another tragedy like this happen again. [applause] always a temptation to ationalize and discount evil, to disengage, to draw within
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ourselves, to isolate, and that temptation has existed within every generation. , ronald reagan once said whether we like it or not, it is our responsibility to preserve world peace because no one else can do it. [applause] if there was ever a time in the , toory of our country follow the path created by our great president ronald reagan, it is now. ,onald reagan stood for peace strength. he stood for a strong american military that was second to none. [applause]
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ronald reagan had a clear moral vision for america. president reagan was once theusly asked, how does cold war and? -- end? without hesitation, he said, we wind, and they lose -- we win, they lose. [applause] struggles with radical , that is how it has to be -- we win, they lose. [applause]
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let's work together to continue the legacy of ronald reagan and make sure that america remains safe and strong. may god bless you and the greatest country on earth. thank you. ♪ [applause] rifle association ceo wayne lapierre was among the peakers at the annual cpac conference. he criticized universal background checks and gun registrations. this is about 25 minutes.
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[applause] >> thank you. thank you. thank you so much. thank you. it is great to be here today among so many friends. i really appreciate that warm welcome. not getan imagine, i do invited to many parties in this town. that is okay. i came to washington when i was about your age. i did not come here to be popular. i came here to stand for what i believe is true. the political elites, they may not like. the liberal media can keep
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hitting on me -- hating on me. i am still standing unflinching in defense of our individual freedom. [applause] crazy orcall me anything else they want. nearly 5 million members, and americans, 100 million gun owners, will not back down, not ever. i promise you that. the second amendment, our second amendment, it is not just words on parchment. it is not some frivolous suggestion from our founding fathers to be interpreted by whim. what a at the heart of discount -- what this country was founded upon. our founding fathers knew that
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without the second amendment and that freedom, all of our freedoms could be in jeopardy. our individual liberty is the very essence of america. it is what makes america unique. if you are not free to protect yourself when government puts its thumb on that freedom, then you are not free at all. the insult, they denigrate, they call us crazy for holding fast to that belief. in their distorted view of the world, they are smart to do that -- smarter than we are. they are special. they are more worthy than we are. they know better than we do. disagree, they will scorn us, they will demonize us, and they will try to shut us up. we will not be demonized.
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we will not be silenced. [applause] there are americans all over this country that feel like you do in this room today. it is time for us to take the same look at the insanity that has consumed all too much of the media and the political class in this town. condemning theger nra. they call us crazy. no othere, organization in the world, has spent more millions over more decades to keep america safe. -- firearm safety trip safety training programs, law enforcement training, women's training, hunter education, child accident prevention program are second to none, while gun ownership is at an all-time high in this country right now.
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[applause] here is the thing -- while that has happened, we've brought accidents with firearms in this country down to an all-time low. [applause] year, we teach millions of law-abiding people how to use, store, and defend themselves with firearms. we have been training america's military and law-enforcement officers cents an hour ray's founding in 1871 -- since nra's founding in 1871. in december, and i advanced nothing more than surrounding our schoolchildren with the same level of protection as our jewelry stores and sports stadiums. armed protection. [applause] majority of americans
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agree in favor train armed police and security officers in every school. of all 50 states, nearly 90% of teachers and administrators said unarmed officer would make their schools safer. not aow this -- there is mom or dad anywhere that would not feel safer at seeing a police car in the parking lot when they drop their kids off at school. [applause] powerful elite will always have their own security called our proposal absurd. do you know what is really absurd? not protecting our children at schools. [applause]
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thousands of our schools today remain vulnerable as ever to the evil intentions of a madman, while janet napolitano cost department of homeland security offers this from its web site -- you are caught -- caught out in the open and cannot conceal yourself, you might consider overpowering a shooter with whatever means are available here. the video shows an office worker pulling out a pair of scissors out of the door. -- a drawer. scissors? that's the answer. we recommend a trained professional with a gun to protect our kids at school. they recommend a scissors. [laughter] they say we are crazy? [applause]
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it is sheer madness. here is what the political elite offer instead, a placebo called universal background checks. that is a big idea, a background check. a check that will always be far from universal, will never make our schools are on our streets safer, and will only serve as universal registration of lawful american gun owners. the real goal -- you know it in your heart -- it is the real goal they have been pushing for decades. criminals will not participate. the records of the mentally ill will never ever be part of that check. hippa laws and patient privacy issues, the
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monsters at newtown and oro, those names will never be in the system. those killers orally are crazy. crazy.ly are advocates and politicians behind the scheme have pot -- have fought behind the scenes to prevent mental health records from being added to the check system. i have been in a bunch of the back rooms where they walked in and say, we cannot do this. there check only includes good law-abiding people. it will be people like you and me. that is to their check will be. that is what they are after, the names of good, decent people all over this great country who happen to own a firearm. base into a federal data with universal registration of every lawful gun owner in america. that is their answer to criminal
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violence? criminalize 100 million law- abiding gun owners in a private transfer, build a list of all the good people, as a goal that would make a safer from violent criminals and homicidal maniacs? that is their answer? are they insane? [laughter] what is the point of registering all lawful gun owners anyway? some newspapers can print those names and addresses for gangs and criminals to access? you know that has happened before. be hacked byan foreign enemies like the chinese recently packed pentagon computers, so a list can be handed over to the mexican and by the way, they already requested that list from our government? in the end, there are only two
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reasons for government to create at federal registry, to tax them, or to take them. [applause] no fun owner, no rational thinking he american believes that will have any affect on government -- on violent criminals and their rights. it will not make anybody safer anywhere. and it isbling saddening how quickly this whole debate has deteriorated from what would truly help make people safer into what has proven to be a decades old agenda of those bent on destroying the second amendment. new,have offered nothing nothing hall full in making our schools, our streets, or one child in this country safer. senator dianne feinstein admitted that she had heard on
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ban until ready to go out your drawer,ked away in a waiting for the right opportunity. really? waiting for an unspeakable tragedy to push their political agenda? is it any wonder why most americans don't trust congress? they are simply not serious about making our kids or our country safer. if they were serious, they would arrest, they would prosecute, and they would imprisoned felons with guns, gangs with guns, and drug dealers with guns, as many as they could find. [applause] that's what they would do. and that's with the public wants. but they do not do that. what they do instead, if they let them go free. let's talk for a minute about this thing called sequestration. i run the nra.
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not an economic think tank. but i watch the news. i see that instead of rational belt-tightening, the first thing the government thinks to do, according to law-enforcement officials, and let thousands of criminal illegals out of jail. you know what? normal people all over the country think that's crazy. [applause] it is as if sanity itself has been sequestered in washington. we have all these federal gun with stiff prison time. except the federal justice system says, we are not going to do that.
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federal prosecutors say, just kidding, normal law abiding people all over this country think that is crazy. and nowhere, nowhere in this country does that apply anymore then chicago. federal firearms prosecutions for 2012 dropped by almost 30% from their peak in 2000 four. -- 20404. federal firearms prosecutions in chicago dropped 45% from 2010- 2012. president obama's hometown ranked dead last in firearms prosecutions, 90 out of 90 federal jurisdictions. out of 76,000 prohibited persons flagged by the instant check system, only 13 were successfully prosecuted nationwide. vice president biden, you heard him say it, he said, they don't have time to prosecute.
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excuse me? don't have time to prosecute prohibited people trying to illegally get a gun? but, the vice president does have time to offer advice to women threatened by an intruder. [laughter] i am going to quote him directly just walk out, walk out and said that double-barreled shotgun and fire two blast outside the house. you are smiling, but, gosh, the vice president of the united states actually told women facing an attack to just empty their shotguns into the air. honestly, have they lost their minds over at the white house? [applause]
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it does not make any sense. no doubt the violent predators would love to visit woman, armed with a shotgun, that is empty. well, mr. vice president, and you feel the same way, but i'm going to say it. for four decades you have enjoyed the armed protection of capital police and secret service officers. all while trying to destroy the second amendment rights of the rest of us. so when it comes to that right, sir, you seek your advice, you keep your advice, we'll keep our guns. [applause]
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and that's what i'm getting in rooms all over america from the american public. i see a lot of young women here today. here is more political advice from the elites who seem to think they know what is best for you young women. some members of the colorado legislature think women are too emotional to deal with violent attacks. listen to this -- senator jesse labarre he said better than using a firearm, you would be better off using ballpoint pens to stab an attacker when he stopped to reload. a ballpoint pen? at the university of colorado at colorado springs, officials recommend that women defend themselves against a rapist with passive resistance. passive resistance? the one thing a violent rapist
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deserves to face is a good woman with a gun. [applause] and they call me crazy? and yet the people doing the finger-pointing are saying is that are absolutely bizarre. i can't help but think that as americans, we all want the same thing. we know our mental health system is in shambles. we all want it fixed. we want criminals with guns prosecuted and incarcerated. we want the federal government on the books right now in force against -- enforced against
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felons and gangs with guns. if they would just do that, those violent criminals would not be on their way to their next crime. they would be in prison. [applause] we want our children to be safe and protected. that is why the proposed train -- trained police and security officers in every school in the country. there is not a mom or dad in america who wants to leave their children unprotected. if the washington elite, if they really wanted the same thing, they would stop trying to demonize law-abiding gun owners all over this country. they would stop trying to convince the american people that all gun owners are potential criminals in waiting. and they would actually implement programs that addressed our problems in a real and meaningful way.
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put police and trained armed security in every school. enforced the federal government's right now that are on the books. incarcerate violent criminals before they get to the next crime scene. rebuild our broken mental-health system. help the mentally ill by getting them off the streets and into treatment. and, for god sakes, leave the rest of us alone. [applause] the political class in the media just don't get it. in a lot of ways, they have lost track of what this great nation is supposed to be about. it is supposed to be about us, and people like us. all over
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this great country. it has always been about we, the people. not the political class. all the way back to our founding and our country. here is what i am talking about. [video clip] >> in a recent closed-door speech to donors, politicians, and media, bill clinton spoke about american gun owners. a lot of these people, although they got is their hunting and fishing. and we all remember obamas comments -- they get bitter, they cling to guns or religion. the arrogance of their superiority requires this reminder. they don't give us rights. we grant them power. they don't make us safe -- we pay to protect them.
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they don't make us free, we are free already. as long as we have the second amendment, we always will be. we are america, and our politicians are only as our full as we, the people, allow them to be. [applause] >> says it all, doesn't it? we are the people, this is our country. this is a fight for our freedom, the freedom that separates us, each one of us, from every other nation in the world areas that freedom makes us stronger than other countries. that freedom makes us better than other countries. that freedom, that freedom is now on the line. now, and in 2014, in 2016, and in every political fight in your lifetime.
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that is what standing and fighting and defending freedom is all about. when i first came to washington's many years ago, i wanted to make a difference. i wanted to stand for something. this is not an easy place to remain true to your principles. it is an easy place, this town, to want to be liked and want to be praised. it is easy to be swept up in the warped reality that all too often is this town. you, each one of you here today, you are here because you want to make your own difference. take your own stands. plant your feet firmly in the foundation of freedom. don't be swayed by the winds of political insanity. no matter what the elitists who
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scorn you say, let them be damned. fill your heart with pride, fill your eyes with conviction. this is your time to stand and fight, now in this election, the next election, and the election after that. always stands and always fight for our great american freedom. thank you very much. it is great to be with you today. thank you. thank you. ♪applause] >> rick santorum addressed the conservative political action conference one day after the death of his nephew, billy. views ond his american history and the future of the conservative movement. pleases about 20 minutes.
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welcome the political editor of townhall.com. [applause] >> thank you all so much. i am political editor of townhall.com. it is such an honor to be sharing this roster with the money committed conservatives am a brilliant thought leaders, influential politicians, and also a host of celebrity apprentice all-stars. when i first heard that donald trump had been invited back to this year, i honestly thought it was a hoax. i demanded to see the original, longform version of his invitation. which he has suspiciously refused to produce. i can't help but wonder what he is hiding. i think the american people deserve answers. to that end, i dispatched a team of investigators to new york to look into the matter.
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so far, all they managed to find was a series of bankruptcy filings. with trump, we know that the conservative outreach movement to minorities will begin with locking up -- in 2016, the nominee will be able to count on the support of trump, john boehner, and a sizable percentage of the umpaloompa demographic. we have a great pogrom this afternoon. thank you for being here. the honorable rick santorum is a former senator from pennsylvania, and the founder forces. he has penned bestsellers. please join me in welcoming senator rick santorum. [applause]
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♪ >> thank you. thank you very much for that very warm and kind welcome. yesterday i was in pittsburgh, where karen and i spent some precious and painful moment with aaron's brother and his family. at the bedside of their oldest son. billy was a terrific, vibrant young man, who, for the past few months has been struggling against a horribly painful disease that began ravaging his body almost overnight.
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yesterday, he was not the one in pain. medicines were effectively blocking all his physical pain. we were the ones in pain. our family and his girlfriend were in incredible agony as he slowly and peacefully took his last breath. i could not help but have my experience yesterday impact my message to you today. i thought of buddha's first noble truth -- to live is to suffer. our society has done an amazing job in reducing physical pain with medicines, by dulling our senses. but that has come within epidemic of addiction and dysfunction. and it is not just opt her's
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seekot just doctors that to eliminate pain. as their allies in education deny truth, so there is no wrong, and therefore nothing to worry about. their allies in hollywood and the media promotes a culture of titillation and violence that numbs our senses in an attempt to please us. all of this has resulted in an epic of psychological moral, and spiritual pain and suffering. as a philosopher says, america has conquered the world of pain. but we have lost our soul, our meaning, our hope and our purpose. let me take you back to my
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nephew's bedside. because there was more going on yesterday than just suffering. through the tears were words of encouragement and comfort. our tears were full of hope, that all of this suffering was not in vain. that this was not the end. i must admit that experiencing the death of my young nephew was a surreal experience. as i looked over at my suffering wife and held her hands, i begin to think about her and i being on another floor of that same half full, 22 years ago. i was at her bedside, holding her hand, and she was experiencing excruciating pain. she was in labor with our daughter, elizabeth. like other mothers, she endure that pain because the pain had reason and purpose. that made it bearable.
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new life. just like our pain yesterday, as we ushered billy into a a new life with our lord and savior. [applause] here is another truth, this time from victor frankel, a man who survived auschwitz. he who has a why to live for can bear almost any how. how is suffering. americans are suffering today, particularly lower income americans. but how are they suffering? are lower income americans injuring more physical hardship in the same americans 200 years ago?
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are americans worse off today from the stand point of health? no we are not. we are living longer than ever, with drugs and devices like it is going in spite of ourselves, sometimes. how about material health? objectively speaking, thanks to technology, and the dynamics of our economy, a low income person today comforts that would exceed the wealthiest americans years ago. our culture and political leadership have robbed them of the why of america. our purpose. [applause] they have transformed the
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american dream that give us purpose and hope inmates suffering much less bearable -- and made suffering much less bearable. what is the american dream? we all know that america is not like any other country in the world. we are not an ethnicity. we are all hyphenated americans. no, america is a why. it is an ideal, a set of principles and values. that is what makes us together. that is what has given us purpose throughout the centuries. and where does that come from? it comes from our founding document, the declaration of independence. before that, if you had gone to georgia, or massachusetts, or virginia, and asked them what they were fighting for, they
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would have given you different answers. but our declaration brought us together and breathed into america its soul. course you know these words, we hold these truths to be self- evident that all men are created equal and endowed by their creator with certain unalienable rights, among them, life, liberty, and the pursuit of happiness. [applause] god is mentioned four times in the declaration of independence. we are the only country in the history of the world -- [applause] we are the only country in the history of the world that has based its premise upon rights given to each and every one of us, from god, not from a
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sovereign, a king, a legislature. we are different, and as a result of that, we have strived and accomplished great things. we have suffered through that. but because of this great purpose, we have been able to endure and prosper and hand america off a little better than what we were. that is the why of america. in its essence, it is a moral enterprise. a moral enterprise focused on the dignity of every human person. if all we do this weekend is offer americans a better way to get more stuff, in hopes that they, that this will dull their
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pain, we and america will lose. face it, the left can always promise more stuff. and make it sound like they care more. because they make it easier for americans by providing the stuff for them. government programs, paid for by somebody else's money. for those in our movement to want to abandon our country is a moral underpinning so we can win, permit me to paraphrase a great teacher and asked, what does it profit a movement to gain the country and lose his own soul? [applause]
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the left in america and around the world has made that so stephen faustian bargain. the sake of our country and our move and, we must not. president obama says he wants to transform america. leave it to president obama to see himself in such a grandiose role in the world. but let's be honest, america has been in the process of transforming for 100 years. he just wants to close the deal. he has successfully offered a new deal to the american public. he and his friends in washington will reduce the pain and the suffering, -- in exchange, we have to abandon the why of america. he wants to exchange the why of the american revolution for that
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of the french revolution. [applause] the marquee day lafayette, after the american revolution, the french revolution was underway. let's this country with a picture frame. the picture frame had two places in it. each for a document. the first side of the picture frame housed the declaration of independence. the second was empty. he hoped to go back to france and place in that picture frame a document similar to america's. a document that also established a great moral enterprise. a great why, that would encourage people to bear much.
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to fight for those high-minded and symbols. and leave something great for the future. when he died, that place was still empty. why? because the french revolution, although it sounded like ours, the french revolution was raised on equality and liberty, it sounds like us, but the final word of the french revolution was fraternity. rights did not come from the father, they came from each other. they read latest the sovereign king with a sovereign mob who could lord power over the people. it led to the guillotine and to bonaparte. what we see in modern-day europe is simply a descendent of that
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bargain. a godless -- [applause] a society that is godless, without faith, specifically anti-clerical, anti-god, where the government is the center and they are the ones who care for us. this is president obama's new deal. give them more power. give them more authority. they will take care of you. how do we turn this around? how do we make a difference in america today? i have tried to do my part. [applause] karen and i started a
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organization called patriot voices, to speak for those principles, not just in washington, but across this country. we have a movie showing this afternoon called "my sacred honor" which explains the work of citizens united, explains this tension that exists in america today. and understand our role in it. how do we win? how did we when the american revolution? was it because red bigger guns, nicer uniforms, better generals, more discipline and order? no. it was because we wanted it more. because we had the passion on our side. we had a set of conviction, because we were fighting for something good and noble. let's face it, the passion in america has been on the other side. they lived their lives everyday to transform us.
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and we, think everything is going to be just fine, america is not going to change much, we just go about our lives areas not that we don't live good lives. most americans live very good lives. but we do not have the passion that they do. in every aspect of our lives, to rise up and fight against what our founders said was the greatest threat to freedom. time. time. the erosion, the erosion of our values over time. we will lose that revolutionary fervor, that passion for truth. and so it is happening. i am not here today, as i have been across this country, because karen and i are committed that we are not going to let that happen on our watch.
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[applause] i would say to all of you, don't look to washington d.c. to solve this problem. i served 16 years in the congress. i can tell you, there are very few leaders in congress, there are a lot of followers. they stay very close to where the american public is. congress and the president are a reflection of what america is today. if you look to them to solve your problems, let me assure you, you will be disappointed. the answer is here. at the turn of the last century it was written, he was asked to publish an article entitled "what's wrong with the world?" chesterton agreed to read the article. he submitted it to the tabloid.
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they published this, "what's wrong with the world?" "i am." we are the answer, because in part, we are the problem. we, who have so much, has to rededicate ourselves in our churches, in our families, in our communities and our school boards. and our local, nonprofit organizations. in every aspect of our lives. we have to fight for the principles that make this country great. we have to fight for those who are suffering and being left behind. they don't want government money. they want your money.
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not because they want your cash, they want what comes with it. your karen, your mentorship,-- your caring, your mentorship, your love. all things government cannot give. [applause] we called the generation that survived world war ii the greatest generation -- why? because they were more virtuous than you, more courageous than you? no. no, they weren't. they, too, try to avoid the war, tried to avoid suffering. only after we had a f on pearl harbor, we washed friends fault. omb ony after we have a b perarl harbor,
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we watched, in hopes that somehow things would just work out. that is what the greatest generation did. here is the difference. they became great, because when there country needed them, they met the challenge of their age. today, i ask you, join me at patriot voices. join me in preserving the american dream. and fighting for your dream. text me. text the word dream, plus your dreams, and how you want and plan to make that dream happen. to preserve america. at 67463 you do that, you commit yourself to being the next great generation.
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and we, we, will be the ones who not only saves america, but preserves that last great for the world. -- hope for the world. thank you and god bless you. [applause] ♪ >> the annual cpac conference heard from donald trump. he emphasized the importance of u.s. manufacturing and energy production. this is 15 minutes. ♪ >> thank you very much.
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he did very well on the apprentice, i have to tell you. very talented guy. our country is in very serious trouble. we owe $17 trillion and have more than a $1 trillion yearly deficit. that means we are losing numbers that nobody has ever heard of before. anywhere. any country. nobody has ever heard of numbers like this. likewise, the republican party is in serious trouble. the good news is, that the country has tremendous untapped potential. absolutely tremendous. the republican party, i can almost say, is going to be a little bit tougher. especially as you get more and more conservative. they get nasty, they don't like to hear what we have to say. it is not easy. we have to get the momentum
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back. we have to get it back weekly, quickly, before it is too late. before we waste that incredible potential that we still have. we have to get it back. the president is given unprecedented media protection. it is incredible, when you see what is going on, it is absolutely incredible. with the republicans, especially as you get more and more conservative in your thinking and your thought -- is really just the opposite. as republicans, if you think you're going to change very substantially for the worst, medicare, medicaid, and social security, in any substantial way, and at the same time, you think you're going to win elections, it just is not going to happen.
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the way we solve our problems, because polls have come out, even the tea party, which i love so dearly, 78% of the people said, leave my medicare, my medicaid, my social security alone. that tea party. what we have to do, and the way we solve our problems, is to build a great economy. we don't have a great economy right now. china has, other people have, other countries have. we do not have a great -- we do not make things any more. we were great manufacturers. we don't make things anymore more, we buy things from other countries area do not only china, all over the world. we buy. we have to rebuild our economy. we have to do it again. we have to make america strong again, and make america great again. [applause] thank you.
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when it comes to immigration, you know that the 11 million illegals, even if given the right to vote -- you will have to do what's right, but the fact is, 11 million people will be voting democratic. you can be up front, you can be the spearhead, you can do whatever you want to do, but every one of those 11 million people will be voting democratic. it is just the way it works. you have to be very careful. because you could say that to a certain extent, the odds aren't looking so great right now for republicans, that you are on a suicide mission. you are just not going to get those votes. i say to myself, why aren't we letting people in from europe? i have many friends, many many friends, from europe who want to come in.
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people i know. tremendous people. hard people. -- hard working people. they cannot come in. i know people whose sons went to harvard, top in their class. went to the wharton school of finance. great students. they happen to be a citizen of a foreign country. they learn, take all of our knowledge, and throw them out. we educate them, we make them really good, they go home, they can't stay here, so they work from their country and work very effectively against us. how stupid is that? top of your class at harvard and you get thrown out of the country. something has to happen. you have been reading about the
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white house tour. i suggested that -- actually newt gingrich suggested it for me, it was nice. he volunteered for me that i would pay for the entire year. i said, that's ok. somebody told me, it was very nice of newt. i love newt. anybody who's a member of my club, i love. maybe president obama should join one of my clubs.[laughter] that is a sad thing. i understand it will be reinstated, i would certainly be willing to do it. i will give you something, a small but emblematic. couple of years ago, i was at a major state dinner. it was in a tent in the white house lawn. a bad tent, probably the guy who owns it made a fortune. i said to myself, here is china, in a tent.
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i called the white house, at someone i know very well, very high position, i said, i will offer, free of charge, to build the most youthful ballroom there is in the country, anywhere. i will do it, it will cost anywhere from $50 million-$100 million. you get the greatest architects, to get perfectly sympathetic with the white house architecture. it will be fabulous. they said thank you very much. what an offer. we never heard back. that is the problem with the country. that is what happens. you don't hear from people. now, when you get right down to it, from the standpoint of conservatives and republicans, you have got to win elections. when you have people that are well-meaning, but governors saying it is the stupid party, and i heard that statement, i said, what a horrible statement to make.
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what a horrible statement. that is a statement that will come back and haunt you and the democrats start using it. you have to change that. you have to change that thinking. when i watch somebody who spends $400 million on campaigns, with perhaps the worst at the have -- worst ads i have ever seen. they did ads on obama that i thought was being paid for by the obama campaign. they were so incredible. you remember the famous superhero ad? people wanting superhero. it was done by the republicans. when you spend $400 million, and it is a failure, and you do not have one victory, you know there is something seriously wrong. i have made over $8 billion.
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when i was thinking of running, i actually filed by financial statement. a lot of people were actually surprised. more than that, i have employed tens of thousands of people. and yet, i am continually criticized by total lightweights all over the place. it is unbelievable. [applause] you see these guys, these guys on television, they can't buy a clean shirt, and they're saying donald trump, he is nothing. thousands of people. i am very proud of what i've done. if mitt made one mistake, and i like mitt romney a lot, but if you made one mistake him a it is -- it is that he did not talk enough about his success. honestly, people really want success. they want a leader who is
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successful. mitt has done a great job. i feel that the republicans, and mitt, and i told him this, did not speak enough about the things he did. the great things. they were on the defensive instead of taking that offensive. i recently bought a country club, it was improperly run for years and years. tiger woods just won the tournament there this weekend. i am going to fix it, i am going to make an incredible. i am going to make that place in credible. that is we have to do it this country. we have got to fix it. we have got to make it incredible. right now we are a laughingstock. you see what is going on with afghanistan and karzai, he has no respect for us. in all fairness, we are leaving. he probably said, wow, i will be stuck here alone. still, this guy, when i watch, i say, how can leadership allow
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that to happen? lose lives of great and wonderful people. we lose so much when we have nothing. when i heard that we were going into iraq, some very smart people told me, well, we are going for the oil. i said, ok. i get that. there is nothing else. we do not take the oil. you when i said, well, it spend $1.5 trillion, we should take -- they have the second largest oil reserves in the world after saudi arabia. 1.5 trillion, we should take it and pay ourselves back. [applause] what are we doing? what are we thinking?
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bush orit is obama or whoever, what were they thinking? for those soldiers that were killed, i said we should pay those families money. we should give them money. they lost their sons and their daughters and $1 million to a family is nothing compared to the kind of wealth we are talking about over there. right now you have someone running iraq in which we do not know who it is and i guarantee you they are building palaces and everything else and we have nothing. it is a sad thing. look at what looked with syria and south korea. i buy all my televisions from south korea. lg's, etc. we do not make them in our country anymore. i did criticize. why do you now buy it here? we do not make those kinds of televisions.
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north korea gets frisky. what do we get out of it? aircraftur beautiful carriers and destroyers and every time you turn on the engine, it is millions of dollars. what do we get out of it? we get nothing. we are run byat either very foolish or very stupid people. what is going on in this country is unbelievable. our country is a total mess. a total and complete mess. what we need is leadership. by fixing the economy, we are able to solve the problems that we really do need to solve and immediately as a nation -- medicare thomas medicaid, social security. medicaid, social
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security. part of the reason that the republicans and democrats are talking we need to cut, it is because our country is not doing it. new technology has shown that we have tremendous wealth right under our feet. right under our feet. north dakota is a great example. [applause] we are not allowed to go and get it. so we go to the opec. they are old friends of mine. they think we are the stupidest people on earth. they cannot believe what they are getting away with. the energycome capital of the world easily. havei say is this -- we to start building things. we have to start manufacturing and not just taking care of people.
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that is not manufacturing. that is money going out. we have to bring money in. this country needs to start building things again. we had to take back our jobs from china. we have to take back our jobs from other places. [applause] when apple talks about apple building all of this stuff and how we are also proud of it, they build 100% of their products in china. china should be more proud of apple that we are to be honest with you. we have to start manufacturing and building again. we have to make america great again. sold.ur problems will be thank you. it is a great honor. thank you. thank you. [applause] ♪ >> 2012 republican presidential
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candidate mitt romney i just -- addressed the conservative political action conference. he received a standing ovation when he promised to work with them in the future even though he had not won the presidency. by southroduced carolina republican governor nikki haley. this is 20 minutes. [cheers and applause] >> thank you. thank you very much. it is great to be here in washington, d.c. not really. [laughter] this is the hardest part about my job. this place is the hardest part
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about my job. i will tell you that the president in washington, d.c. is the hardest part about being the governor of south carolina. i will tell you that they have thrown it at is pretty good. when you look at the facts that him and his union thugs turned around and through at 1000 nonunion workers in south carolina, do you know what he said? not then sto in south carolina. [applause] aree on thousand workers now 6000 workers. -- those 1000 workers are now 6000 workers. [applause] yourew it out as an said cannot have voter id. we said, not in south carolina. every election in our state requires photo id before you vote. [cheers and applause]
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and now they are trying to throw up on the care and tell us we have to expand medicaid. do you know what we said? not in south carolina. [applause] am the governor of south carolina, we will not expand medicaid on his watch. [cheers and applause] .e will not expand medicaid we will make sure we take care of people that we know best to take care of and we do not need washington' elss help to do it. i have the good fortune today to tell you that there is something very special. when you see a leader and a leader fights for what they believe and and they fight to prove to make a difference in the country and a leader fights -- ands through what
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things do not go our way, what makes a true servant leader is when they come back to talk about. [applause] michael and i have gotten to know him. i wish everyone could know that these people are such strong people of faith. they have a love for their family that everyone should cherish. they have a love for this .ountry it only grows stronger. he is a patriot. he knows business. we saw him make businesses successful. he knows how to create jobs and does not expect government to do it. he understands the fact that you can go and fix the olympics that is broken and make it better.
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this is a leader who is a servant because he loves his country. this is a leader who is back to tell you thank you. need toa leader we stand up and give the loudest applause for ever and say we appreciate your fight and your love for this united states of america. please help me welcome governor mitt romney. [cheers and applause] playing "born free" ♪ [cheers and applause] >> thank you. thank you.
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thank you. thank you. [cheers and applause] thank you. .ou touch my heart again thank you. .hat a sight you are what a privilege to be with you again and how much i appreciate your earnest support and help. thank you to governor nikki haley for that wonderful introduction. she has courage and conviction. her principles that guide her as governor. we more governors like nikki haley. [applause]
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thank you for your support in the very beginning. you were there from the beginning and made a difference. you worked on the front lines promoting my campaign and made calls. i owe each of you my appreciation for help on that campaign. with the help of so many of you, i had the honor of becoming the nominee of our party for president of the united states. [cheers and applause] i was given the great privilege of experiencing america in a way never anticipated we would get to do. citizens opened up their hearts and homes to us. i left the race disappointed because i did not win, but i also left honored and humbled to have represented the values that we believe in and to speak with many good and decent people.
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before inst races the past, but that prepares us for larger victories. it is up to us to make sure that we learn from our mistakes and my mistakes and that we take advantage of that learning to make sure that we take back the nation, take back the white house, take back the senate and put in place conservative principles. [applause] it is fashionable in some circles to be pessimistic about , about conservative solutions and the republican party. i reject pessimism. [applause] one on november 7, but we have not lost our way. our nation is full of aspirations and hungry for solutions. we are a nation of invention and reinventing.
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my optimism about america was not diminished by the campaign. it grew as i saw the people of america and heard their stories. i have seen the american determination. a furniture rental business for conventions in las vegas. when 9/11 hit, when the recession hit, that tanker convention business, that she did not give up. she did not close down or lay off people. she taught her people how to make furnisher of stop her business thrived. i have seen a perseverance. one person drove a truck for 10 years and he could afford to go to college. he majored in geology. there must be oil and notochord up. must be oil in north dakota. 16 holes.
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it is estimated by sent to have as many as 500 billion barrels of oil. [cheers and applause] i've seen risk taking. the losses in the mounting business. the mill needed to shut down and the plant manager they borrowed and invested everything they could find to buy the business. theiraved the jobs and of colleagues and they grew sale from $5 million a year to $50 million a year. people of the great faith, i'ved that honor of being in the of these men of god.
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i met heros in our armed forces. men and women who resigned with the national guard after multiple tours in afghanistan. they knew they would likely be in another tour. i met heros of the homes in the nation. single moms working two jobs so their kids can have the same thing other kids have. dads don't know what a weekend is because they have taken on so many jobs so they can keep the house. the heart of america is good. our land is blessed by the hand of god. may we as the people, always be worthy of his grace and his protection. \[applause] like you, i believe that a conservative vision can attract
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a majority of americans and form a governing coalition of renewable and reform. now, as someone who just last the election i'm probably not the best person to chart the course for the next one. with that being said, let me offer this advice. perhaps because i'm a former governor, i would urge us all to learn lessons that come from the greatest success stories and this is 30 republican goffers across the country. republican governors across the country. \[applause] they are winning elections but more importantly they are solving big, important problems. the governor in georgia secured a constitutional amendment to make sure they can have charter schools. governor rick snyder got a right to work in michigan.
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\[applause] a number of these republican governors were able to secure tort reform and a hoard of republican governors inherited budgets that were badly out of balance and replaced deficits with surpluses. \[applause] these governors have shown they are able to reach across the aisle, offer innovative solutions and they are willing to take the heat that you have to do to do important things. we need the leadership. the ideas and the vision of these governors. we particularly, by the way, to hear from the governors in the blue and purple states because those are the states we need to win to get back the white house. these are the people we need to listen to and make sure their message is heard loud and clear across the country. \[applause]
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now, we can also learn from the examples of principle and passion that we've seen in the last few weeks in washington, d.c. by republican leaders. i might be bias but i applaud the clear and convincing voice of my friend paul ryan. \[applause] now, if i were to offer advice to any person who was or became the president of the united states it would be this, do whatever you can to keep america strong, to keep america prosperous and free, and the most powerful nation on earth. it is no secret that the last century was an american century. it is no secret that over the span of the coming century that is not written in the stars. america's position is not
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guaranteed. the consequence, if america were to be surpassed by another nation would be devastating. why do i say that? the other leading contenders for world leadership, china, russia, not one of them excepts freedom as we understand it. only america and american strength can preserve freedom for us, the rest of the world, and the people we love. \[applause] anddom depends on america american leadership depends on a military so strong, so superior that no one would think to engage it. our military strength depends on an economy so strong that it can support that kind of military. our economy depends on a people that are so strong, so educated, so resolute, so hard working, so inknow vintive, so
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focused on the creating a great future for their children. that is the america we grew up in. that is the america that our children deserve. \[applause] just think about america. what nation but ours would have enjoyed military power for 25 years and never used it to seek revenge against it's foes or to seize natural resources from the weak? what nation is the first to bind up the wounds of the injured from hurricanes and tsunamis and war? what nation is the largest contributor to the fight in africa against aids? rescuetion came to the
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of others in the face of tyranny in korea, street nan, bosnia, afghanistan, kuwait, iraq. when you think of this -- whatever you think of these interventions, the impulse behind every one of them is little bit per ration not conquest. in all of human history, there has never been a great pow their is so often used that -- power so use that power to liberate others. we must teach our children and we must, ourselves, never forget. \[applause] i'm inspired by a nation for people who live for something
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bigger than themselves, their schools, their community, their faith, their country. i marvel at the brilliance and the sacrifices made by the founders. i'm proud of our immigrant heritage. proud that so many of us came here because we wanted to be here. because they wanted to raise their families here and have a better future and because they wanted to worship their god here. i was at a campaign stop in san antonio, texas. i met a guy who came here in 1976 to escape the killing fields in cambodia. his first job was picking fruit. in 1976 -- later than that he joined a campaign of george herbert walker bush as a
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volunteer. he was given a job to work in the white house then the state department. then he was appointed as the united states ambassador to the united nations. he said that when he stood to speak in behalf of this great country he would ask himself, in what other country in the world would a impoverished refugee become an ambassador to the united nations? \[applause] this nation began with an idea, a nobble one. -- a noble one. the idea was that every person is endowed by their creator with unailable rights. freedom flows in american vains. it invigorates our enterprises and inspires us to live beyond ourselves. it calls for us to care for the suffering.
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it has made us a great nation. the country is in per real by mounting debt, failing institutions, by families stressed beyond the limits, by schools failing to make the grade and public servants are more focused on scoring political points than scoring national victories. each of us in our own way has to step up in and meet our responsible. i'm sorry i won't be your president but i will be your co- worker and work shoulder to shoulder alongside you. \[applause]
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because you see in the end, in tend we'll win. we'll win for the same reason we won before because our cause is just and it is right. look i -- i want to thank you again for your support and your help along the journey. anne and i are going to treasure the memories we've had throughout our life. god bless you. god bless this great nation. we love you. thank you so very much. thank you. \[cheers and applause] >> our live coverage from the conservative political action conference continues tomorrow. speakers include sarah palin, david keene, ann coulter and
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texas senator ted cruz. that is live beginning at 7:00 a.m. eastern on c-span. next president obama talks about alternative energy. then defense secretary chuck hagel announces the launch of interceptor missiles on the west coast. >> a more private first lady, elizabeth monroe did not want to make social calls. she spoke french inside the white house. we'll explore the relationship with her husband and the close relationship with her successor. we'll see the important role she played in the election of her husband john quincy adams. went include your questions and
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comments by phone, facebook, and twitter live monday night at 9:00 on c-span. >> now president obama talks about energy strategies and calls for congress to set aside $2 billion over the next decade to support advanced vehicle research. department'sergy largest national laboratories for science and research. this is 25 minutes. \[applause]
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>> hello, everybody. hello, illinois. hello. it is good to be home. let me begin by saying thank you for that great introduction and the leadership she is showing with her team on so many different and amazing breakthroughs. thank you to dr. isaac for giving me a great tour of your facilities. it is not every day i get to walk into a thermal test chamber. \[laughter] i told my girls that i would go into a thermal test chamber and they were pretty excited. i told them i would come out looking like the hulk. \[laughter] they did not believe that. i want to say thank you to my
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friend and your friend, senator dick durbin. \[applause] an outstanding member of congress who can explain some of the things going on is here. \[applause] congressman bobby rush. glad he is here. we have a number of state and local officials with us, including your mayor. \[applause] and i could not come to argonne without someone who has served our country so well for these past four years, dr. steven chu.
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\[applause] now i'm here today to talk about what should be our top priority as a nation. that is reigniting the engine of american economic growth. a rising, thriving middle class and an economy built on innovation. in my state of the union address, our most important task was to drive that economic growth. i meant it. we should be asking ourselves the questions -- how to make america a land for good jobs? how do we equip people with skills and training to do those jobs? hardo we make sure that work leads to a decent living?
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please feel free to sit down. i'm sorry. everyone is standing. maybe it was one of the effects of the sequester. you had to get rid of chairs. \[laughter] i chose argonne national lab because few areas hold more promise for creating good jobs and growing our economy than how we use american energy. after years of talking about it, we are poised to take control of our energy future. we produce more oil that we have in 15 years. we import less oil than we had in 20 years. we have doubled the amount of renewable energy that we generate from wind and solar. tens of thousands of good jobs to show for it. we are producing more natural gas than we have before that hundreds of thousands of good jobs to show for it.
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we have supported the first new nuclear power plant in america since the 1970s. we are sending less carbon pollution in the environment and we have in nearly 20 years. we are making progress across the board. it is possible in part because of labs like this and outstanding scientists like many of you -- entrepreneurs, innovators -- all of you are working together to take your discoveries and turn it into a business. think about this. americanrs ago, the auto industry was flatlining. thanks to discoveries made right here at argonne, some of the most high tech, fuel- efficient, pretty spiffy cars in the world are once again engineered, and built
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here in the united states. that is why we have to keep investing in scientific research. we have to maintain our edge. the work you are doing today will end up in a product we make and sell tomorrow. you're helping to secure our energy future stop if we do it well, that will help us avoid some of the perils of climate change. it will leave a healthier planet for our kids. to do it, we have to make sure we're making the right noises in washington. andother day, dr. isaac directors of two other national laboratories wrote about the effects of the so-called sequester, across the board budget cuts. it will have an effect on scientific research. one of the reasons i was opposed to the cuts is because they do not distinguish between vital investment and wasteful programs. they do not trim the fat, but cut into muscle.
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there is research being done here that gives a great place for researchers to come, but also to create all kinds of stuff that create good jobs. willsaac said these cuts force him to stop any new projects down the line. he says, the sudden halt will freeze american science in place while the rest of the world races forward. it will cost millions of dollars in missed future opportunities. because of the sequester, we are looking at two years where we do not start new research. at a time when every month you have to replace your smartphone because something new has come
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up, imagine what that means when china and germany are their research and we are sitting there doing nothing. thesenot afford to miss opportunities while the rest of the world races forward. we have to seize opportunities. i want the job breakthroughs in energy or nanotechnology or bioengineering to be right here in the united states of america and creating american jobs and maintaining our technological lead. \[applause] i want to be clear -- these cuts will harm and not help our economy. toy are not the smart way cut deficits.
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that is why i'm reaching out to democrats and republicans to come together around a balanced approach smart, phased-in approach to deficit reduction. smart spending cuts and new revenue that will not hurt the middle class or slow economic growth. if we do that, we can move beyond governing from crisis to crisis and keep the focus on policies that create jobs and grow the economy. we can move forward to fixing the broken immigration system and educating our kids and keeping them safe from gun violence. few pieces are more important than getting the energy future right. here at argonne and other labs around the country, scientists are working to get us where we need to be. what most americans feel first when it comes to energy issues
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are prices they pay at the pump. we went through another spike in gas prices. people were not happy about it. the problem is that it happens every year. it happened last year and the year before that. it is a serious blow to family budgets. it is coming right out of your pocket. every time it happens, politicians dust off their plans for two dollar gas, but nothing happens. that may go through the same cycle again. over the past four years, we have not just talked about it. we have started to do something about it. we work with companies to put in place the toughest fuel economy standards in history.
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what that means is that at the middle of the next decade, cars will go twice as far on a gallon of gas. the standards that we set are what is driving engineers and scientists working in labs. we have set achievable, but ambitious goals. in the middle of next decade, we expect you will fuel up and spend half as much. average family will save money at the pump. that is worth applauding. that is good news. \[applause] a new report issued today show that america is becoming a global leader in advanced vehicles. you walk into any dealership today and you'll see twice as many hybrids to choose from as they were five years ago. seven times as many cars that can go 40 miles a gallon or
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more. general motors sold more hybrid bugles than ever before. ford is selling some of the most fuel efficient cars. we are helping businesses succeed and we are creating good, middle-class jobs in america. so, we are making progress, but the only way to break this cycle of spiking gas prices is to shift our cars entirely off oil. that is why i called on congress to set up an energy security trust to fund research new technologies that will help us reach that goal. i would like to take credit for this idea because it is a good
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idea, but i cannot. basically my proposal builds up a proposal that was put forward by a nonpartisan coalition that includes retired generals and admirals and ceos. they came together around a simple idea -- much of our energy is drawn from lands and waters that we own together. takehey proposed is to some oil and gas revenue from public lands and put it toward research that will benefit the public. we can support american ingenuity without adding a dime to the deficit. we can support scientists that are designing new engines that are more energy efficient and developing cheaper batteries that can go farther on a single charge. support scientist and engineers that are devising new ways to fuel cars with advanced biofuels and natural gas. tovers can one day go coast coast without using a drop of oil.
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it is not just about saving money. it is also about saving the environment. it is also about our national security. for military officials like general paul kelly, as is about national security. for business leaders, like the ceo of fedex, it was about economic security. when gas prices go up, it is harder to expand operations and create new jobs. these leaders say we need to fix this. this is not a democratic or republican idea.
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it is just a smart idea. we should be taking their advice. let's set up an energy security trust that helps us free our families and businesses from painful spikes in gas once and for all. we can do it. \[applause] keepe meantime, we will moving on the all of the above strategy that we have been working on for the last couple of years where we are producing more oil and gas at home, also producing biofuels. we are producing more solar power and wind power. we are working to make sure that here in america we are building cars and homes and businesses that waste less energy. we can do this. the nature of america's miraculous rise has been our
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drive, our spirit, our willingness to reach for new horizons, our willingness to take risks, our willingness to innovate. we are not satisfied with how things have been. we will try something that we might imagine now, but will achieve. that is the nature of america. that is what argonne national lab is about. that is what this facility is about. \[applause] two decades ago, scientists at argonne led by mike -- where is he? \[applause]
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mike started work on a rechargeable battery for cars. some folks at the time thought the idea was not worth it. he said if you have the technology, the car would cost a lot and would not go far enough. knewike and his team better. they knew you could do better. and america, our federal government made it a priority. we funded those efforts. mike went to work. teamothers gave up, the kept on at it. when development hit a snag, the team found a solution. they created a lithium battery that costs less and lasts longer. what was an idea two decades
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ago is now rolling off assembly lines in cutting edge comedy fuel efficient cars. 20 years ago or 20 years from now, we will be offering solutions to our problems that we cannot even comprehend. as long as the pipeline for research is maintained, as long as we recognize that we do together as a country -- and the private sector in its own will not invest in this because it is too expensive. we cannot afford it. we have got to support it. we will all benefit from it.
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kids will benefit from it and our grandkids will benefit from it. that is who we are. that has been the american story. you do not stand still. we look forward. we turn new ideas into new industries. we change the way we can live our lives. that is how we sent a man to the moon. that is how we invented the internet. when someone tells us we can do, we say, we can. i'm confident that we will succeed as long as we do not lose that spirit of innovation and recognize we can only do it together. i will work as hard as i can every single day to make sure we do. congratulations, argonne. keep it up. god bless you. god bless america. \[applause] \[captions copyright national cable satellite corp. 2013] \[captioning performed by
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national captioning institute] ♪
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\[applause]
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>> next defense secretary chuck hagel announces the deployment of interceptor missiles on the west coast. fromsome of the speakers the political action conference. we're simple fact is getting older together and we're not not same -- our fertility rates have dropped and having an inverted pyramid. it makes our challenges as it relates to entitlements and social security even greater. japan and europe and russia and now china is starting to feel the impact of its one child policy. we're better off than the rest of the developed world but our
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fertility rate has dropped to 1.8, the lowest drop in history. we have a try and true way to deal with this demographic time bomb. the path that we could take is to allow for a strategic reform of our immigration laws so we can bring young, aspirational people that will rebuild the demographic pyramid to make our entitlement secure and jump- start our economy in a way that would create an uplifting of our hopes and dreams. but also directly impact u.s. growth. jebormer florida governor bush on immigration wars part of book tv this weekend on c-span2. >> the pentagon will spend $1 billion to add 14 interceptor
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missiles to the west coast. defense secretary chuck hagel made this announcement during a briefing with the press core. he says she's he is to ensure protection. with the joint chiefs of staffs and defense under secretary for policy james miller. this is 25 minutes. >> good afternoon. i have a statement, and then i will take a couple of questions and ask the under secretary, the vice chief to address the specific questions you have about the topic that we will talk about.
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today, i am announcing a series of steps the united states will take to stay ahead of the challenge posed by iran and north korea development of long- range missile capabilities. defense has missile systems in place to protect us from icbm tax, but north korea, in particular, has recently made advances in its capabilities and has engaged in a series of irresponsible and reckless situations.
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specifically, north korea announced last month it has conducted its third nuclear test this appears to be a road mobile icbm. also, it is using the taepodong- 2 missile, demonstrating progress in their development of long-range missile technology. in order to bolster the protection of our homeland and state ahead of this threat, we are taking four steps. first, we will strengthen the homeland missile defense by deploying 14 additional ground- based interceptors at fort greeley, alaska. that will increase the number of ground-based interceptors from 30 to 44, including the four gbi's at vandenberg base in california. this is nearly a fifth to% increase in air missile capability. second, with the support of the japanese government, we are planning to deploy additional radar in japan. the second radar will provide improved tracking of any missile launched in north korea at the united states or japan. third, as directed by congress, we are conducting an environmental impact studies for an additional situation in the united states.
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notthe administration is made a decision on whether to proceed, conducting the impact studies will shorten the time line, should that decision be made. and fourth, we are restructuring the sm3-2b program. as many of you know, we plan to deploy the sm2. thisimeline for deploying was affected by recent cuts. they're also looking for advanced kill technology that will improve the performance of being gbi and other versions of the sm3 interceptor. we will be able to add
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protection for missiles from iran soon and provide additional protection from missiles of north korea. the nato missile defense. that remains on plan. -- iron-clad. the missile deployments the united states is making in three phases will be adapted with sites in poland and romania. we will also do as planned by 2018. the collective result of these of for your decisions will be for the to improve our ability to counter missile threats from iran and north korea while maximizing scarce taxpayer resources. the american people expect us to take every necessary step to protect their security at home and u.s. security strategic issues abroad, but they expect us to do so in the most efficient manner possible. by taking the steps i outlined today, we will strengthen our
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defense, maintain our commitments to our allies and partners, and make clear to the world that the united states stands firm. thank you. bob? >> mr. secretary, can you say with confidence that the ground-based interceptors in alaska will shoot down a north korean missile aimed at the u.s., given their test performance? >> well, as you know, there was an issue regarding our gyro system. as you probably know, we are going to further test this year. ourave confidence in system, and we certainly will not go forward with the additional 14 interceptors until we are sure we have the complete confidence we will need, but the american people
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should be assured that our interceptors are effective. >> when it? and do you believe this could be a deterrent against a country like north korea? >> well, we are looking at having all 14 interceptors in place by fiscal year 2017. the reason that we are doing what we are doing, and the reason we are advancing our program here for homeland security is do not take any chances, is to stay ahead of the threat, and to ensure any contingent's. thisis why we made decision that we have. >> secretary, in hindsight, was it a mistake to take the missile off-line and now having to spend the money to reactivate
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it? >> well, i'm going to ask either the vice chief or another to answer that question, because they have been through the process. i will take one more, and then we will get back. >> when north korea will have a true, intercontinental ballistic missile. >> one of the reasons we're doing what we have is to assure that whenever their time lines are, we're not reacting to this time lines, we're ahead of any time lines. that there isent 30 in place and 14. 44 by the end of 2017. it gives our country the security needs and people need
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to be reassured the security is there. let me ask the undersecretary and the vice chiefs to take your specific questions. thank you. >> can you be clear on one thing? it deploying the 14 additional -- 40 additional interceptors by 2017 is contingent on the defense agency approving that the warhead is verified and kidder heart -- can hit a target. is that the case? >> that is exactly right. we will stick with our approach. e2 had a couple of test failures. looking forward to go next couple of months.
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going forward from that we would be looking to make changes to those that are currently in place and the interest of shareinterceptors [inaudible] will go forward on a reasonable timeframe. if i could take this opportunity to say that whether the earlier decision to put a pause on this was a mistake, i think the time based on the inside -- the assessment we had, we received resources will have to spend. the threat was not certain. we did not know -- it was the concept of having a hedge being prepared to go from 30 to 44 ground-based interceptors, we
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may need to not implement and that is what we're doing today. reaction from china and russia and other countries other than japan? [inaudible] first of just say that the japanese -- let me say we have talked to the japanese. wherecretary indicated are moving forward with a radar. we have informed the chinese and at this point we cannot characterize their reaction. >> they did not object? did you consult with them? >> we informed them. i am curious --
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, american positions, will this cover those as well? >> this provides coverage of not just the continuity of the united states but all the united states. that was the one that secretary pena announced in japan. another second grader? >> that is correct. your often talking about when you look at an adversary the capability. the secretary talked about this new capability but how much of it is a new assessment of the -- leader's attentions intentions based on the incredibly caustic language these last few weeks?
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inthe policy is articulated the defense review and stay ahead of the threat with respect to north korea and iran. that means staying ahead of where we believe the capability would be. on thenot contingent assessment of the intentions. deterrence exists in two ways. theot only intend to put mechanics in place to deny any potential north korean objective but also to impose costs upon them if we do. we believe that they ought to be determined -- deterred by that and if not he will -- we will be ready. knowow soon will you no
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[inaudible] >> we want to make sure we had a successful test. and that test was extremely successful. missile defense agency put it through its paces and it passed with flying colors. the real deciding factor on how long it will take to conduct a test is how long it will take us to build another interceptor. it is a matter of doing that and we will do another test. they have started assembling, and that is a technical piece of equipment. it takes a while to put together. >> you talked about the -- when you talk about the costs for this project and how it fits into the sequester? also, this may be obvious, but i do not know, where the third gbs is.
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>> the cost of this step will include, first of all, additional funding for the missile field one, to complete hal that, and then for the additional interceptors, or, in fact, we will do is take test assets and bring them up to the standard and then replace them with additional gbi's, so there is another 14 ground-based interceptors because of this. very real numbers. less than $1 billion. overall, that is our best current estimate. >> they have delivered 53, and there are 70. >> as you know, the last test failed. there were a number of these in various stages of production, and that was halted. when we have a successful test,
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that will resume. those existing missiles on the production line would continue. i do not have the exact numbers on how many. we need to get the specifics on that. >> are you going to stop work anywhere else to fund this billions in the project? >> the funds that we will be requesting start in fiscal year 2014. bill part of the budget that we will be submitted to congress in the coming weeks. congress mandated three locations for a potential additional site in the united states, and they mandated that two be on the east coast, so the agency is currently assessing what locations on the east coast, and we will most likely have the third be where we have interceptors. >> you cannot be more specific? >> not yet. >> obviously, it is a question
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of regional interest. will this program announced today have an effect for plans for a site in poland's? >> it will have no impact on that. we will go forward as planned with the first three phases of the european phased approach, employing about 23 interceptors, sm3 interceptors, same time on, same footprint, with u.s. forces to support that, and as the secretary said, the same coverage. >> to that same point, did not the secretary say that you were saving some money on that? >> that is correct. the prior plan had four phases. the third was about
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interceptors in poland, and we will continue with the phases one at route 3. additional, other types of interceptors would have been added. we no longer intend to add them to the mix, but we plan to have the same number of deployed interceptors with the coverage for all of nato europe. >> the upshot is that the europeans will see no difference in their ballistic missile defense. the phase four was about continuing defense of europe but also being able to extend that defense to part of the united states. it turns out that by doing what we are announcing today, and remember, phase four was not going to appear until 2020 to or beyond, but the threats are growing faster. we are going to get better defense of the united states and get it a lot sooner, so it makes complete sense to do this. >> sir, you said this threat is
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going faster. can you expand on what we are talking about here? >> particularly with north korea, but we are also keeping a close eye on the iranians. int april, we saw a parade p'yongyang that had mixed accounts of whether they were real or fake missiles, and we have also seen a third nuclear test recently. obviously, without getting into intelligence aspects, we watch this very, very closely. as you know, at the beginning of this missile defense attorney, we knew that we would have to be potentially adaptive, so we have continuously build this hedge that we could select if the threat either goes faster or slower than we thought, so the korean threat went a little
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bit faster than we expected, so we pulled the tools off of the shelf. >> let me just add to what the admiral said. >> do you know that that's kno8, whether it has the range to reach the united states? >> we probably want to avoid the intelligence aspects of that, but we believe and probably does have the range to reach the united states, and where it exists is something else, too. >> the nuclear test. has the u.s. been able to confirm that that was, in fact, a nuclear test, and if so, was it a uranium device or a plutonium device? >> i would not want to get into that.
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>> to japan, wendy you expect to deploy it? ande continue to build deploy additional sm3 interceptors. we are moving from deployment. with japan, the number of those interceptors will continue to grow, and that will be true, including our continued efforts for the pacific. you will see a growing number of sm3 interceptors. with respect to the timeline, we are in conversations with the japanese government about precisely when that can be accomplished, and at this point, i would say it is a
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matter of the least some months. >> with what we have over do we expect more? >> the exact number of bmd capable, on my fingertips, it is about five. the doctor really hit the point on that.
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[applause]
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>> thank you all so much. i am political editor of it is such an honor to be sharing this roster with the money committed conservatives am a brilliant thought leaders, influential politicians, and also a host of celebrity apprentice all-stars. when i first heard that donald trump had been invited back to this year, i honestly thought it was a hoax. i demanded to see the original, longform version of his invitation. which he has suspiciously refused to produce. i can't help but wonder what he is hiding. i think the american people deserve answers. to that end, i dispatched a team of investigators to new york to look into the matter. so far, all they managed to find was a series of bankruptcy filings. with trump, we know that the conservative outreach movement to minorities will begin with locking up -- in 2016, the
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nominee will be able to count on the support of trump, john boehner, and a sizable percentage of the umpaloompa demographic.and we have a great pogrom this afternoon. thank you for being here. the honorable rick santorum is a former senator from pennsylvania, and the founder forces. he has penned bestsellers. please join me in welcoming senator rick santorum. [applause]
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♪ ♪ >> thank you. thank you very much for that very warm and kind welcome. yesterday i was in pittsburgh, where karen and i spent some precious and painful moment with karen's brother and his family. at the bedside of their oldest son. billy was a terrific, vibrant young man, who, for the past few months has been struggling against a horribly painful disease that began ravaging his body almost overnight. yesterday, he was not the one in pain. medicines were effectively blocking all his physical pain.
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we were the ones in pain. our family and his girlfriend were in incredible agony as he slowly and peacefully took his last breath. i could not help but have my experience yesterday impact my message to you today. i thought of buddha's first noble truth -- to live is to suffer. our society has done an amazing job in reducing physical pain with medicines, by dulling our senses. but that has come within epidemic of addiction and dysfunction. and it is not just doctors that seek to eliminate pain.
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as their allies in education deny truth, so there is no wrong, and therefore nothing to worry about. their allies in hollywood and the media promotes a culture of titillation and violence that numbs our senses in an attempt to please us. all of this has resulted in an epic of psychological moral, and spiritual pain and suffering. as a philosopher says, america has conquered the world of pain. but we have lost our soul, our meaning, our hope and our purpose. let me take you back to my nephew's bedside. because there was more going on yesterday than just suffering. through the tears were words of encouragement and comfort.
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our tears were full of hope, that all of this suffering was not in vain. that this was not the end. i must admit that experiencing the death of my young nephew was a surreal experience. as i looked over at my suffering wife and held her hands, i begin to think about her and i being on another floor of that same half full, 22 years ago. i was at her bedside, holding her hand, and she was experiencing excruciating pain. she was in labor with our daughter, elizabeth. like other mothers, she endure that pain because the pain had reason and purpose. that made it bearable. new life. just like our pain yesterday, as we ushered billy into a a new life with our lord and
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savior. [applause] here is another truth, this time from victor frankel, a man who survived auschwitz. he who has a why to live for can bear almost any how. how is suffering. americans are suffering today, particularly lower income americans. but how are they suffering? are lower income americans injuring more physical hardship in the same americans 200 years ago? are americans worse off today from the stand point of health? no we are not. we are living
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longer than ever, with drugs and devices like it is going in spite of ourselves, sometimes. how about material health? objectively speaking, thanks to technology, and the dynamics of our economy, a low income person today comforts that would exceed the wealthiest americans years ago. our culture and political leadership have robbed them of the why of america. our purpose. [applause] they have transformed the american dream that give us purpose and made suffering much less bearable. what is the american dream?
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we all know that america is not like any other country in the world. we are not an ethnicity. we are all hyphenated americans. no, america is a why. it is an ideal, a set of principles and values. that is what makes us together. that is what has given us purpose throughout the centuries. and where does that come from? it comes from our founding document, the declaration of independence. before that, if you had gone to georgia, or massachusetts, or virginia, and asked them what they were fighting for, they would have given you different answers. but our declaration brought us together and breathed into america its soul.
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you know these words, we hold these truths to be self-evident that all men are created equal and endowed by their creator with certain unalienable rights, among them, life, liberty, and the pursuit of happiness. [applause] god is mentioned four times in the declaration of independence. we are the only country in the history of the world -- [applause] we are the only country in the history of the world that has based its premise upon rights given to each and every one of us, from god, not from a sovereign, a king, a legislature. we are different, and as a
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result of that, we have strived and accomplished great things. we have suffered through that. but because of this great purpose, we have been able to endure and prosper and hand america off a little better than what we were. that is the why of america. in its essence, it is a moral enterprise. a moral enterprise focused on the dignity of every human person. if all we do this weekend is offer americans a better way to get more stuff, in hopes that they, that this will dull their pain, we and america will lose. face it, the left can always
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promise more stuff. and make it sound like they care more. because they make it easier for americans by providing the stuff for them. government programs, paid for by somebody else's money. for those in our movement to want to abandon our country is a moral underpinning so we can win, permit me to paraphrase a great teacher and asked, what does it profit a movement to gain the country and lose his own soul? [applause] the left in america and around the world has made that so stephen faustian bargain. the sake of our country and our move and, we must not.
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president obama says he wants to transform america. leave it to president obama to see himself in such a grandiose role in the world. but let's be honest, america has been in the process of transforming for 100 years. he just wants to close the deal. he has successfully offered a new deal to the american public. he and his friends in washington will reduce the pain and the suffering, -- in exchange, we have to abandon the why of america. he wants to exchange the why of the american revolution for that of the french revolution. [applause] the marquee day lafayette, after
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the american revolution, the french revolution was underway. let's this country with a picture frame. the picture frame had two places in it. each for a document. the first side of the picture frame housed the declaration of independence. the second was empty. he hoped to go back to france and place in that picture frame a document similar to america's. a document that also established a great moral enterprise. a great why, that would encourage people to bear much. to fight for those high-minded and symbols. and leave something great for the future. when he died, that place was
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still empty. why? because the french revolution, although it sounded like ours, the french revolution was raised on equality and liberty, it sounds like us, but the final word of the french revolution was fraternity. rights did not come from the father, they came from each other. they read latest the sovereign king with a sovereign mob who could lord power over the people. it led to the guillotine and to bonaparte. what we see in modern-day europe is simply a descendent of that bargain. a godless -- [applause] a society that is godless, without faith, specifically anti-clerical, anti-god, where
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the government is the center and they are the ones who care for us. this is president obama's new deal. give them more power. give them more authority. they will take care of you. how do we turn this around? how do we make a difference in america today? i have tried to do my part. [applause] karen and i started a organization called patriot voices, to speak for those principles, not just in washington, but across this country. we have a movie showing this afternoon called "my sacred honor" which explains the work of citizens united, explains
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this tension that exists in america today. and understand our role in it. how do we win? how did we when the american revolution? was it because red bigger guns, nicer uniforms, better generals, more discipline and order? no. it was because we wanted it more. because we had the passion on our side. we had a set of conviction, because we were fighting for something good and noble. let's face it, the passion in america has been on the other side. they lived their lives everyday to transform us. and we, think everything is going to be just fine, america is not going to change much, we just go about our lives areas not that we don't live good lives.
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most americans live very good lives. but we do not have the passion that they do. in every aspect of our lives, to rise up and fight against what our founders said was the greatest threat to freedom. time. time. the erosion, the erosion of our values over time. we will lose that revolutionary fervor, that passion for truth. and so it is happening. i am not here today, as i have been across this country, because karen and i are committed that we are not going to let that happen on our watch. [applause] i would say to all of you, don't look to washington d.c. to solve
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this problem. i served 16 years in the congress. i can tell you, there are very few leaders in congress, there are a lot of followers. they stay very close to where the american public is. congress and the president are a reflection of what america is today. if you look to them to solve your problems, let me assure you, you will be disappointed. the answer is here. at the turn of the last century it was written, he was asked to publish an article entitled "what's wrong with the world?" chesterton agreed to read the article. he submitted it to the tabloid. they published this, "what's wrong with the world?" "i am."
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we are the answer, because in part, we are the problem. we, who have so much, has to rededicate ourselves in our churches, in our families, in our communities and our school boards. and our local, nonprofit organizations. in every aspect of our lives. we have to fight for the principles that make this country great. we have to fight for those who are suffering and being left behind. they don't want government money. they want your money. not because they want your cash, they want what comes with it. your caring, your mentorship, your love.
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all things government cannot give. [applause] we called the generation that survived world war ii the greatest generation -- why? because they were more virtuous than you, more courageous than you? no. no, they weren't. they, too, try to avoid the war, tried to avoid suffering. only after we have a bomb on pearl harbor, we watched friends fall. we watched, in hopes that somehow things would just work out. that is what the greatest generation did.
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here is the difference. they became great, because when there country needed them, they met the challenge of their age. today, i ask you, join me at patriot voices. join me in preserving the american dream. and fighting for your dream. text me. text the word dream, plus your dreams, and how you want and plan to make that dream happen. to preserve america. at 67463 you do that, you commit yourself to being the next great generation. and we, we, will be the ones who not only saves america, but preserves that last great hope
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for the world. thank you and god bless you. [applause] what he stressed the independence of states and proposed overhauling the tax code without raising any new revenue. prior to his remarks, congressman steve scalise spoke. this is about 35 minutes. [applause] ♪ ♪ , it is great to be here. i want to thank you for putting be here and honor to
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with conservatives who are standing up to fight for constitutional freedoms we hold so dear. we all know what is happening in washington, d.c., and the threat that is under attack. if you look at the results of the election, we were is appointed by the results of the presidential race. everyone was hoping there would be a calvary coming very -- we realized there is no coloring. there is one thing the american people did. the american people also redirected a conservative republican majority to still stay in the house to be a check and balance against barack obama. we take that seriously. 171 members. it is the largest in congress. we are committed to fighting
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andciples we believe in pushing back against barack obama and epa and national labor relations board. it seems like every federal bureaucrat is trying to attack the free enterprise system. if you look at with the election is really about and what people thought about the election, people wanted us to focus on jobs and the economy. people wanted us to control spending. when you look at the first term of barack obama, if you look at the results, the price of gas is up. federal spending is up. household income is down. taxes are up, but small business startups are down. i think you see the picture. the results of the last election did not work out well for the middle class. this president was reelected.
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it shows us we have got a lot of work on our hands to do. i think it also shows us, if you look at conservative possibles, we ran on principles. we ran on balancing be federal budget. we are at an impasse. what did the president layout as his agenda? he talked about failed stimulus programs. he talked about trying to take away our second amendment rights, which we will not let him do. [applause] the president talked about continuing on this rampage. he talked about his green energy at than -- agenda. this whole idea of the federal needs to make it
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harder for manufacturing to go on in america. he talked about global warming. the president was wearing a trench coat when he was talking about global warming. just last week, a hearing on capitol hill on global warming was canceled because of snow in washington, d.c. you can't make this stuff up. when you look at what the american people want us to focus on, they want us to get back to basics. it starts with energy. hydraulicta, fracturing. it is a revolution that has been country.hroughout our the president is trying to use the epa to shut that down. you contrast that with the president home state. liberal policies, over nine percent unemployment. you have the highest budget deficit of any state in the country is the state of
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illinois. it just so happens that north dakota is run by republicans and illinois is run by liberals. we are not going to allow that. we will not let them continue to push that on america. let's talk about what can get the economy moving again? , weome state of louisiana have done it through energy production. it is creating good jobs, good high-paying jobs. , you have president a green light to the keystone pipeline. with one stroke of the pen, barack obama could make thousands of jobs. yet, he continues to say no to projects like the pipeline. he talks about nothing below. he had -- he is against fossil fuel development.
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he is still using fossil fuels. if you look at one energy production, that is a way to get our economy moving again. we have to focus on controlling washington spending. there are some who don't believe washington has a spending problem. nancy pelosi said the other day, she thinks it is almost a false argument to say that washington has a spending problem. there is a bureau of public debt. it is probably one of the busiest buildings in town. you ought to go there. do you know where it is? it is in chinatown. this is true. you can't make this stuff up. ought to bring obama .ut there and see yo we pushed our leadership to commit to holding the line.
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$85 billion of real cuts. even though there was pushed back, we've held on. we are going to force washington to start living within its means. that is what families do. the president is going around" -- going to close the white house to school children. the r word processors you can get for $50, say that $300,000. let kids go back in the white house. that he isnted out going to lay off food inspectors. there are billions of dollars in fraud in the food stamp program. we are going to force washington to control spending. we brought a budget forward that balances in a 10-year window. tax reform, so we can create jobs in america again.
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we contrasted with the presence of budget which does not that. you look at obama care. we had a a hearing to uncover a scandal and there are so many broken promises. your member this new -- do you remember those people who said obamacare is going to be wonderful? so many went secretly to the white house and got waivers. we uncovered this about a year and a half ago. for 200 got waivers to obamacare. -- 1400 people. they got a secret waiver. who in here got a waiver? aerybody here deserves waiver. it is called review -- repeal of obamacare. [applause] theave got to restore american dream. conservatism is not dead. if yourican dream,
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google the american dream, you don't see some federal building in washington, d.c. that shining city on the hill still exists to read we the ones that are going to have to fight to defend it. i have a five-year-old and a three-year-old. we have to make sure we pass on that same opportunity, that same american dream. it is under attack. it is not going to go away. i thank you for what you do and standing up for our constitutional freedoms and getting our country back on track. thank you all for being here and for having me. [applause] ♪ ♪
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>> ♪ >> ♪ louisiana and to another, governor bobby jindal has improved the state business climate worried he has put forth landmark education reforms. made fun ofntly president obama and eric holder to their face.